UPDATE 7/24: Heat Wave Continues in Siberia

By: Christopher C. Burt , 7:54 PM GMT on July 22, 2013

UPDATE July 24th: Heat Wave continues in Siberia

The extraordinary and perhaps unprecedented heat wave continues in the central arctic region of Russia. Some locations have now endured 10 consecutive days above 30°C (86°F). Wildfires are erupting in the taiga forests (see more about this in the comments section following this blog). Norilsk maximum daily temperatures have cooled down a little, but yesterday (July 23rd) it enjoyed its warmest night so far with a low of 20.2°C (68.4°F).

Norilsk, with a population of 175,000, is located at 69° 20’N and 88° 6’E and is the most northerly city in the world with a population over 100,000.



Norilsk is a large city of some 175,000 located in the Arctic region of central Russia near 70° N latitude. It is the largest, most northerly city in the world. Photo by Mikhail Shlemov.



It has long been a mining center (and gulag during the Stalin years) located in the far northeast of Russia’s Krasnoyarsk Krai Region. For the past week temperatures have been running as much as 10-15°C above normal throughout the central arctic region of Russia. The 32.0°C (89.6°F) measured at Norilsk on July 21st would appear to be short of the city's warmest temperature on record which was 32.2°C (90°F) on two previous occasions.



Monthly climate data for Norilsk, Russia. Weatherbase on Wikapedia.com. However, the POR for this data may be just for the past 30 years and other sources say the city has seen temperatures as warm as 32.2°C in the past.



Weather data for the past month at Norilsk as of July 23rd (the date on the table is observation date for previous 24 hours). Note the minimum temperature of 20.2°C (68.4°F) on July 23rd! OGIMET data.

Svetlogorsk, just above the Arctic Circle at 66° 56'N, has now endure an astonishing 10 consecutive days above 30°C (86°F) as of July 23rd and had a run of three consecutive days above 90°F (32.2°C).




Weather data for the past month at Svetlogorsk located just about on the Arctic Circle (at 66° 50'N and 88° 24'E in the Krasnoyarsk Krai region like Norilsk). Note the amazing endurance of this heat event. The complete METARS data was missing for the July 14th observations but at 6 a.m. UTC (about 10 or 11 a.m. local time) it was 27°C (80.5°F), so the high for that day was probably around 28-29°C (83°-85°F). The normal daily high temperatures for this site the last half of July are around 20°C (68°F). OGIMET data.


The prolonged heat wave is the result of an amazingly intense and prolonged heat dome that has centered itself over north central Siberia. The anomalous temperature heights are some 2-3 sigmas above normal.



500 mb heights and anomaly map for July 21st when the hat dome was at its strongest. Thanks to Stu Ostro who submitted this graphic in one of his comments on an earlier version of this blog.

Hottest temperatures ever measured so far north?

It remains unclear whether or not any all-time records have been broken at any sites in Russia the past few weeks or if these are the highest temperatures ever observed at so northerly a latitude. The warmest temperature in the region I have been able to view so far was a 34.2°C (93.6°F) at Korliki on July 17th. This site, however, is located at just 61° 32'N. According to OGIMET the temperature reached 34.0°C (93.2°F) at Snezhnogorsk and Igarka on July 21st , both sites just a bit south of Norilsk. Snezhnogorsk is located at 68° 6'N and 87° 46'E and Igarka at 67° 28'N, 86° 34'E. These sites are just a bit south of the latitude of Umiat, Alaska (at 69° 22' N) where a maximum of 92°F (33.3°C) has been recorded in the past. There is a temperature reading of 36.7°C (98.1°F) in July 1979 reported from Hatanga, Russia which rests at 71° 58'N (about 400 miles northeast of Norilsk). This is a very anomalous reading and may have been the result of a foen-like wind event (down sloping wind heated by compression, like Santa Ana winds in the U.S.). IF the figure is accurate, then this would be, by far, the warmest temperature ever measured on earth at such a northerly latitude.

This Russian Arctic heat wave is still on going and I’ll post updates if necessary.

KUDOS: Thanks to Maximiliano Herrera for bringing the heat wave in central arctic Russia to my attention.

Christopher C. Burt
Weather Historian


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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37. bonsaiherb
2:00 PM GMT on July 28, 2013
Thank you for this wonderful topic. It is a strange thing about these northern fires. The smoke from the one in Quebec affected much of Northern Europe. What the Siberian fires will do is up in the air. Unintentional pun there.

My question actually refers to the cold snap in S. America and regards the Southern Polar Jet stream. I still remember the effects from 1975 and this one is not as extreme. That said is July their coldest month -- our January?

I was also interested if this southern jet stream is affecting S. Africa, Australia or N.Z.?

TIA
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
36. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
9:10 PM GMT on July 26, 2013
weatherhistorian has created a new entry.
35. barbamz
9:09 PM GMT on July 26, 2013
I've posted this on the main blog, but I think it belongs here, too, the more as your blog is cited in this article:

It's 90 Degrees in Siberia and People Are Sunbathing

Your mental image of Siberia is probably a snowy, wind-whipped expanse, perhaps with a cluster of buildings to house those banished from Russian society. Not this week. This week, Norilsk, the northernmost large city in the world, the second largest city north of the Arctic Circle, and the site of one of those gulags, hit a balmy 32 degrees Celsius — about 90 Fahrenheit. It's normally in the mid-60s.

The online outlet The Siberian Times ("up-to-date information in English from across Siberia's six time zones") featured a photo of people sunbathing on the shores of Lake Baikal in its report on what may be a new record high.


More see link above.
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34. maxcrc
10:49 AM GMT on July 26, 2013
There is NOTHING UNCLEAR. Everything is pure and simple.
The highest temperature ever recorded above 70N is 36.7C at Khatanga in July 1979.
Highest temperature ever recorded above 66N is 37.8C at Ust Moma in 2010, but since it's just few dozens miles below the Arctic Circle, the record in the Arctic area belongs to Verkhoyansk with 37.3C.
Two absolute records were set Igarka and Snezhnogorsk (68N) both woth 34.0C, others like the 33.2C at Vorkuta were tied.
Norilsk old station had recorded 32.2C in July 1969 an July 1970, station was moved in 1975 with the new ID 23078 and set a record of 31.0C on 5 July 1979.
There were no records approached for the latitude, since Eastern Russia gets higher temperature at the same latitude than Western Russia.
Easy.
There is nothing unknown or unclear.Everything is clear, pure and simple as alpine water. I don't understand all those supposed mysteries.Data is data and luckily Russian climatic data is millions times better than NCDC data, so there is not much bad data to dig into.
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Chris,

Below are the relevant station models at 12Z on July 25. Not much data in Siberia (larger image). Sorry.

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32. bappit
2:29 AM GMT on July 25, 2013
Quoting 31. BaltimoreBrian:


The Ob flows almost as much as the Mississippi--may be near 1 million cubic feet per second now with the snowmelt swelling the river. Warm fresh water may be laying on top of the cold salt water without mixing and causing the rapid rise in temperature as the river flows from the south.

Yes, that just might be warm fresh water from the south at the head of the Gulf of Ob. Wikipedia tells me that the Gulf of Ob is itself 600 miles long (!), the longest estuary in the world. So the part that warmed up so much is a long way from the Arctic Ocean.

I notice that the part of the Kara Sea north of the Gulf of Ob lost some ice in the last 10 days which was replaced with positive SST anomalies. I think that would be independent of the upper Gulf of Ob.

The wiki article mentions that the Gulf of Ob is shallow. Could melting of permafrost during warm floods have created it? Pure speculation, but it is a different landscape up there. I have read about shore erosion along Alaska's north slope being a problem. Seems like a plausible mechanism for creating such a long estuary.
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31. BaltimoreBrian
2:02 AM GMT on July 25, 2013
Quoting 30. SteveDa1:
A ~20 C degree rise in SST's in 10 days?

I've seen better.

... ;)


The Ob flows almost as much as the Mississippi--may be near 1 million cubic feet per second now with the snowmelt swelling the river. Warm fresh water may be laying on top of the cold salt water without mixing and causing the rapid rise in temperature as the river flows from the south.
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30. SteveDa1
1:07 AM GMT on July 25, 2013
A ~20 C degree rise in SST's in 10 days?

I've seen better.

... ;)
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29. BaltimoreBrian
1:01 AM GMT on July 25, 2013
Quoting 26. bappit:

Don't know if the heat wave did it or if it is usual for July, but looks like no ice there. From the DMI Centre for Ocean and Ice:

SST's





For reference, here is a map of the Ob estuary.


Thanks babbit! Your comments are very informative. I wonder how long it will take that warm water to refreeze this fall.

And wow, I had no idea that my link about night heat waves in the Pacific Northwest would cause so much discussion!
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28. Christopher C. Burt , Weather Historian
12:31 AM GMT on July 25, 2013
Quoting 26. bappit:

Don't know if the heat wave did it or if it is usual for July, but looks like no ice there. From the DMI Centre for Ocean and Ice:

SST's





For reference, here is a map of the Ob estuary.


Krikes! Looking at the southern end of the Ob estuary it looks like water temperatures in the 20-23°C (68°-73°F). That's warm enough to swim!

Thanks for these great graphics bappit!
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27. bappit
8:28 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
Looking back 10 days, it would seem that the heat wave has had a decided effect.

SST's





(I'm linking directly to the site, so a few days from now, 7/24/2013, these images will look different.)
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26. bappit
8:09 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 13. BaltimoreBrian:
I wonder if the heat wave has cleared out the sea ice in the Ob' estuary.

Don't know if the heat wave did it or if it is usual for July, but looks like no ice there. From the DMI Centre for Ocean and Ice:

SST's





For reference, here is a map of the Ob estuary.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
25. Some1Has2BtheRookie
6:16 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 22. weatherdogg:
"BTW, there are no heat islands in the Arctic region. I wish one of you would file a formal complaint with NOAA for their fudging the temperature data so that the Arctic would quit losing an ever increasing amount of sea ice volume and permafrost over the past few years. More and more for nearly ever year since the year 2000."

I completely agree with you - what is going on in the Arctic and many other regions is clear evidence that AGW is real and is occurring. Regarding the PacNW study (which I read as I have full access to all AMS journals), I am questioning the methodology of the study, as I should. The data set is small, and it is well known here in the PacNW that there have been problems with the siting of temperature gauges since the late 1980s. The authors accounted for this effect, but inadequately. Flawed studies such as this, particularly when the authors or their universities throw them into the public arena with hyperbolic press releases, do no service at all to those of us who spend endless hours trying to convince skeptics that the available evidence overwhelmingly supports AGW. When they get picked apart (as this one is now), the skeptics and denialists have more ammo.

I apologize for hijacking Mr. Burt's excellent blog - if you want to discuss this more, I am happy to take it offline. Like Some1Has2, I will take no offense if this is deleted in the interest of keeping the comments on track.


I agree with you that the data submitted should be scrutinized for its accuracy. Wrong data leads to bad science. This why scientist continuously review the data and strive for better accuracy and methodology. We need to bring attention to areas that may not be getting the scrutiny that they should. The BEST Report dealt with much of your concerns. More work does need to be if for no other reason than to improve methodology.

Thank you.

Thank you for your response.
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24. Some1Has2BtheRookie
6:06 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 21. ISeeTheRainAgain:
Some1Has2BtheRookie, I find the tone of your post way off base. The above was my first post on wunderground and if it was inappropriate to include a citation to an actual meteorologist with expertise in the PNW, then I apologize. But based on one two-sentence post you have no right to assume what I know or believe.

Recall it was BaltimoreBrian who first mentioned the PNW heatwave study...funny you don't mention him.

I'm familiar with everything you've posted re BEST, the Arctic, etc. and am deeply concerned.

I've strongly disagreed with Cliff Mass on his own blog regarding global warming. I think he's way too blithe about the actual events occurring RIGHT NOW. For instance the likelihood that loss of arctic ice is influencing/slowing down the jet stream.

But sloppy papers can and do get published, and for all his faults and blind spots Mass does post thought-provoking critiques. Unlike the Watts of this world who are now thoroughly discredited.

For the record I think the verdict is still out on the particular paper in question, but I'm not going to just accept arguments from authority re which journal published the paper.


I offer you my apology, if I offended you. I included you in my response based on what you put in your post, "I'm no denialist either, but he makes some good points."

Since your link was to a less than credable article then I thought it best to include you in my response. I will not pursue this further with you here, but I encourage your participation on Dr. Rood's blog
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23. ISeeTheRainAgain
5:53 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
I too apologize for the off-topic nature of my posts. Still learning my way around here. Really enjoy reading these blogs.
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22. weatherdogg
5:33 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
"BTW, there are no heat islands in the Arctic region. I wish one of you would file a formal complaint with NOAA for their fudging the temperature data so that the Arctic would quit losing an ever increasing amount of sea ice volume and permafrost over the past few years. More and more for nearly ever year since the year 2000."

I completely agree with you - what is going on in the Arctic and many other regions is clear evidence that AGW is real and is occurring. Regarding the PacNW study (which I read as I have full access to all AMS journals), I am questioning the methodology of the study, as I should. The data set is small, and it is well known here in the PacNW that there have been problems with the siting of temperature gauges since the late 1980s. The authors accounted for this effect, but inadequately. Flawed studies such as this, particularly when the authors or their universities throw them into the public arena with hyperbolic press releases, do no service at all to those of us who spend endless hours trying to convince skeptics that the available evidence overwhelmingly supports AGW. When they get picked apart (as this one is now), the skeptics and denialists have more ammo.

I apologize for hijacking Mr. Burt's excellent blog - if you want to discuss this more, I am happy to take it offline. Like Some1Has2, I will take no offense if this is deleted in the interest of keeping the comments on track.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
21. ISeeTheRainAgain
4:57 PM GMT on July 24, 2013
Some1Has2BtheRookie, I find the tone of your post way off base. The above was my first post on wunderground and if it was inappropriate to include a citation to an actual meteorologist with expertise in the PNW, then I apologize. But based on one two-sentence post you have no right to assume what I know or believe.

Recall it was BaltimoreBrian who first mentioned the PNW heatwave study...funny you don't mention him.

I'm familiar with everything you've posted re BEST, the Arctic, etc. and am deeply concerned.

I've strongly disagreed with Cliff Mass on his own blog regarding global warming. I think he's way too blithe about the actual events occurring RIGHT NOW. For instance the likelihood that loss of arctic ice is influencing/slowing down the jet stream.

But sloppy papers can and do get published, and for all his faults and blind spots Mass does post thought-provoking critiques. Unlike the Watts of this world who are now thoroughly discredited.

For the record I think the verdict is still out on the particular paper in question, but I'm not going to just accept arguments from authority re which journal published the paper.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
20. barbamz
12:17 PM GMT on July 24, 2013

Source and caption
I got the link from this interesting blog:
Arctic Heat Wave Re-Intensifies Over Central Siberia Setting off Rash of Tundra Fires

Other news about the fires:
Fires in Eastern Russian and Siberia
Posted By News On July 22, 2013 - 6:00pm

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 15. Some1Has2BtheRookie:


There was a scientific study performed by Berkley that addressed these very concerns that you bring up here. Have you ever heard of The BEST Report?

This study was headed by Richard Muller. He was a former skeptic of the temperature data due to "the heat island effect". He has since reversed his concerns on this after completing the study.

The BEST Report was also partially funded by the Koch brothers. I feel reasonably certain that you and ISeeTheRain are familiar with the Koch brothers' stance on climate change?

There is also Anthony Watts. Anthony Watts had stated that he would stand by the results of The BEST Report. He thought he had a sure thing going for him with Richard Muller heading the team and the Koch brothers partially funding the study. Anthony decided that The BEST Report was flawed and therefore could not stand behind its findings.

What you and ISeeTheRain are concerned with is a 20 year time period of temperature data of a small region of the U.S.. 20 years is too short of a time frame to show the long term trend line. Natural variations, such as the PDO as an example and in this case, will cause noise that will need to be filtered out to show the actual trend line. Up or down, as to whatever it may prove to be.

Christopher Burt is a weather historian and Lee Grenci, from his own WU blog, is a "Retired senior lecturer in the Department of Meteorology at Penn State, where he was lead faculty for PSU's online certificate in forecasting." Both of these gentlemen are some of the best in their respective fields of study. Neither, however, have chosen to discuss climate change. Should either you or ISeeTheRain wish to further discuss your concerns, then may I suggest that yo do so here - Dr. Ricky Rood's Climate Change Blog. Ricky's blog is dedicated to discussions on climate change. - BTW, there are no heat islands in the Arctic region. I wish one of you would file a formal complaint with NOAA for their fudging the temperature data so that the Arctic would quit losing an ever increasing amount of sea ice volume and permafrost over the past few years. More and more for nearly ever year since the year 2000.

Christopher and Lee, if I have over stepped my bounds here then please delete this post. I can assure you that this will not offend me.


Mike,

I'm okay with what you wrote. And you're absolutely correct...I try to stick to my own field, and I've stayed away from topics related to climate change on purpose.

As a scientist, I believe that the science of climate change is sound and I just don't see the need to debate the issues any more. We've invested a lot of research dollars to determine scientific answers about climate, and now that the results are published and vetted in peer-reviewed journals, I'm still amazed that there are people who haven't published any research related to climate change are still trying to resist. For me, the results are convincing and compelling, so I don't feel the need to address climate change and the role played by human activity.

When I speak to groups about weather, I have a PowerPoint that presents a litany of examples of how human activity changes local weather patterns on relatively short time scales. In my view, human activity altering earth's climate, especially in the face of peer-reviewed research, is not a topic I believe needs to be debated any more. So I stick to what I know best.

Thanks for your note.

Lee
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 12. stuostro:
To Lee's note about quantifying the 500 mb GPH anomaly, looks like it was in the 2-3 standard deviation range (graphic embedded below).

And looks like I have another slide to add :) http://tinyurl.com/stuostro



Stu,

Funny...I had written 2-3 standard deviations in my original reply to Chris' blog, but I edited it out because I wanted to look at data just to be certain. One of WU's faithful readers, Mike, e-mailed me and asked me about the edit, and I told Mike I wanted to be sure before I started touting numbers.

So many thanks for that, Stu!
Best,

Lee
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17. bappit
5:11 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
Agggggh! I couldn't read all of that in one sitting. Thank you Stu.
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16. georgevandenberghe
4:03 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 12. stuostro:
To Lee's note about quantifying the 500 mb GPH anomaly, looks like it was in the 2-3 standard deviation range (graphic embedded below).

And looks like I have another slide to add :) http://tinyurl.com/stuostro



When giving presentations a rule of thumb is to allow two minutes/slide.

Well there goes a week. But it's worth it!

Here is a tiny splinter to contribute to this sequoia of a presentation


Garden observations in suburban DC MD. 2012 (wx 2007-12)
March 13 Eastern Field crickets SURVIVED THE WINTER.
March 15 Soil over 60F(May level). Planted a single tomato as experiment(in a fr
ost hollow by the way) [[ spoiler.. it survived ]]
April 15. Earliest ever full size lettuce
May 4 Earliest ever broccoli
June 3 Earliest ever tomato (smashed record by two weeks)
June 6 Earliest ever sweetcorn (broke 2010 record by two days 1991 record by fiv
e)

After this point other seasons started catching up.

Temperature records. Warmest ever March 2012. Warmest MAM (spring). Worst sustai
ned 11 day heatwave (June 28-July 8). Perceived (not verified) latest fall deep
(<-5C) freeze (still waiting January 8 2013)

Actually starting in 2007 in Washington DC

Warmest October (2007)

Snowiest DJF (2009-2010)

Warmest June (2010)
Warmest July (2010)
Warmest JJA season (2010)

Warmest July (2011).. smashed previous record by 1.4 degrees F

Warmest March (2012)
Warmest MAM season (2012)

I would argue that these six warm extremes are four statistically separate event
s (not six). There were no coldest month or season
records during this period although December 2010, January 2011 and the 2009-10
winters were notably colder than normal.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
15. Some1Has2BtheRookie
3:56 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 9. weatherdogg:


I don't think the study accounts for the fact that there has been a dramatic expansion of SeaTac since the 1980s, plus the instruments were moved to a location that is much closer to the runways and thus more likely much warmer overnight. The SeaTac records are not a good source to base such a study upon. There was also a change in in 1990 the types of sensors used at all of the sites covered by the study, which may account for part of the increase.

Caveat: I am not an AGW denialist (or even a skeptic) - but I do believe both sides in the debate need to get their facts straight before they throw studies, assertions etc. out into the public arena.


There was a scientific study performed by Berkley that addressed these very concerns that you bring up here. Have you ever heard of The BEST Report?

This study was headed by Richard Muller. He was a former skeptic of the temperature data due to "the heat island effect". He has since reversed his concerns on this after completing the study.

The BEST Report was also partially funded by the Koch brothers. I feel reasonably certain that you and ISeeTheRain are familiar with the Koch brothers' stance on climate change?

There is also Anthony Watts. Anthony Watts had stated that he would stand by the results of The BEST Report. He thought he had a sure thing going for him with Richard Muller heading the team and the Koch brothers partially funding the study. Anthony decided that The BEST Report was flawed and therefore could not stand behind its findings.

What you and ISeeTheRain are concerned with is a 20 year time period of temperature data of a small region of the U.S.. 20 years is too short of a time frame to show the long term trend line. Natural variations, such as the PDO as an example and in this case, will cause noise that will need to be filtered out to show the actual trend line. Up or down, as to whatever it may prove to be.

Christopher Burt is a weather historian and Lee Grenci, from his own WU blog, is a "Retired senior lecturer in the Department of Meteorology at Penn State, where he was lead faculty for PSU's online certificate in forecasting." Both of these gentlemen are some of the best in their respective fields of study. Neither, however, have chosen to discuss climate change. Should either you or ISeeTheRain wish to further discuss your concerns, then may I suggest that yo do so here - Dr. Ricky Rood's Climate Change Blog. Ricky's blog is dedicated to discussions on climate change. - BTW, there are no heat islands in the Arctic region. I wish one of you would file a formal complaint with NOAA for their fudging the temperature data so that the Arctic would quit losing an ever increasing amount of sea ice volume and permafrost over the past few years. More and more for nearly ever year since the year 2000.

Christopher and Lee, if I have over stepped my bounds here then please delete this post. I can assure you that this will not offend me.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
14. Christopher C. Burt , Weather Historian
3:23 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
Quoting 12. stuostro:
To Lee's note about quantifying the 500 mb GPH anomaly, looks like it was in the 2-3 standard deviation range (graphic embedded below).

And looks like I have another slide to add :) http://tinyurl.com/stuostro



That is quite "another slide" Stu!

Thanks for sharing.

Chris
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13. BaltimoreBrian
12:09 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
I wonder if the heat wave has cleared out the sea ice in the Ob' estuary.
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12. Stu Ostro , Senior Meteorologist
12:06 AM GMT on July 24, 2013
To Lee's note about quantifying the 500 mb GPH anomaly, looks like it was in the 2-3 standard deviation range (graphic embedded below).

And looks like I have another slide to add :) http://tinyurl.com/stuostro

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
11. bappit
11:20 PM GMT on July 23, 2013
Quoting 9. weatherdogg:

This is a regional study, not a SEATAC study. Besides, do you really think that a study done by climatologists published in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology did not consider issues like what you bring up? Do you have ***any*** proof for your assertions?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
10. ISeeTheRainAgain
11:03 PM GMT on July 23, 2013
weatherdogg, Cliff Mass has raised similar objections.

I'm no denialist either, but he makes some good points.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
9. weatherdogg
8:28 PM GMT on July 23, 2013
Quoting 5. BaltimoreBrian:

Nighttime Heat Waves Quadruple in Pacific Northwest


I don't think the study accounts for the fact that there has been a dramatic expansion of SeaTac since the 1980s, plus the instruments were moved to a location that is much closer to the runways and thus more likely much warmer overnight. The SeaTac records are not a good source to base such a study upon. There was also a change in in 1990 the types of sensors used at all of the sites covered by the study, which may account for part of the increase.

Caveat: I am not an AGW denialist (or even a skeptic) - but I do believe both sides in the debate need to get their facts straight before they throw studies, assertions etc. out into the public arena.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 6. weatherhistorian:


Thanks for these maps Lee! Can you find any surface weather maps for the region from the past few days?


Chris,

I usually turn to the Ocean Prediction Center. Under the unified surface analysis, you can get three- or seven-day loops, and you can stop the loop to get the analysis you want.

I hope this helps.

Lee
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
7. maxcrc
12:17 PM GMT on July 23, 2013
DISCLAIMER; : The wrong data written in this blog WAS NOT provided by myself.
The absolute record high of Norilsk is 32.2C and it wasn't beaten/
Also, there have been DOZENS of much higher temperatures in the past 3 weeks since late June above the 66N latitude.
Temperatures as high s 36.7C have been recorded at much higher latitude like at Hatanga at 71N back in 1979.
In 2010 a temperature of 37.8C was also recorded above 66N
The exceptionality of this month is for the duration and the average monthly and daily temperatures in a very big area. Data provided in this blog regarding absolute records is incorrect and I AM NOT the source of this
misinformation. Maximiliano Herrera
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
6. Christopher C. Burt , Weather Historian
12:47 AM GMT on July 23, 2013
Quoting 3. 24hourprof:


Here are the long-term average 500-mb heights over Asia on July 22 (larger image).

Looks like the 500-mb heights over northern Russia were way above average today (not surprising). I'll try to remember to quantify the departures from average once the data for July 22, 3013, become available on the ESRL Web site.





Thanks for these maps Lee! Can you find any surface weather maps for the region from the past few days?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
5. BaltimoreBrian
12:37 AM GMT on July 23, 2013
Amazing heat so far north!

I found a couple of articles Mr. Burt may be interested in. He blogged about the smog crisis in southeast Asia earlier this summer.

Haze from Indonesian fires returns to Malaysia

Nighttime Heat Waves Quadruple in Pacific Northwest
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4. mtwhitney
11:48 PM GMT on July 22, 2013
Heat waves in high places!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 2. 24hourprof:
Thanks Chris.

Yet another example of extreme weather caused by a blocking high. Below is the 12Z GFS model analysis of 500-mb heights on July 22, 2013, over the North Polar region...(larger image). 500-mb heights higher than 5820 meters is pretty impressive.



The 12Z GFS model analysis of 500-mb heights on July 22, 2013, over the North Polar region. Courtesy of Penn State. Larger image.


Here are the long-term average 500-mb heights over Asia on July 22 (larger image).

Looks like the 500-mb heights over northern Russia were way above average today (not surprising). I'll try to remember to quantify the departures from average once the data for July 22, 3013, become available on the ESRL Web site.



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Thanks Chris.

Yet another example of extreme weather caused by a blocking high. Below is the 12Z GFS model analysis of 500-mb heights on July 22, 2013, over the North Polar region...(larger image). 500-mb heights higher than 5820 meters is pretty impressive.



The 12Z GFS model analysis of 500-mb heights on July 22, 2013, over the North Polar region. Courtesy of Penn State. Larger image.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1. Astrometeor
8:05 PM GMT on July 22, 2013
Ouch, Russians are feeling the heat.

Thanks Chris!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

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Weather Extremes

About weatherhistorian

Christopher C. Burt is the author of 'Extreme Weather; A Guide and Record Book'. He studied meteorology at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison.