Fantala Tied for Strongest on Record for Indian Ocean; Massive Flash Flood in Houston

By: Bob Henson , 8:47 PM GMT on April 18, 2016

Fierce Tropical Cyclone Fantala stormed to Category 5 strength north of Madagascar over the weekend with an impressive burst of strengthening, making the cyclone as strong as any on record anywhere in the Indian Ocean. Fantala’s estimated peak sustained winds of 150 knots (173 mph), averaged over 1 minute by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, are tied with those of Tropical Cyclone Agnielle (November 1995 peak 1-minute winds of 150 knots) as the strongest in the Southwest Indian Ocean. Fantala and Agnielle both top the record holder for the North Indian Ocean (Super Cyclonic Storm Gonu, June 2007, peak 1-minute winds of 145 knots). Reliable satellite-based records for the Indian Ocean only go back to 1990, but Fantala’s power is still remarkable, and quite evident in satellite imagery. [Update: An earlier version of this post had stated that Fantala was unrivaled as the strongest in the Indian Ocean. Thanks to Phil Klotzbach, CSU, for bringing Cyclone Agnielle to our attention. Klotzbach also includes Tropical Cyclone Monica as an Indian Basin storm, based on its peak 1-minute winds of 155 knots occurring west of longitude 135°E. Definitions vary on the boundary of the Indian Ocean in this area. Monika reached peak strength north of Australia in the Arafura Sea, which is considered by several sources, including the CIA World Factbook, to be part of the western Pacific Ocean.]


Figure 1. A visible image of Tropical Cyclone Fantala collected at 1025Z (6:25 am EDT) on Monday, April 18, 2016, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board the Aqua satellite. The north tip of Madagascar can be seen at bottom. Image credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team.


Figure 2. An enhanced infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Fantala collected at 1020Z (6:20 am EDT) on Monday, April 18, 2016, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board the Aqua satellite. Image credit: RAMMB/Colorado State University.

How Fantala got so strong, and what lies ahead
Conditions were highly favorable for Fantala to intensify. Wind shear has been fairly low over the storm for the last couple of days, around 10 knots, and sea surface temperatures along Fantala’s track have been around 29 - 30°C, plenty warm for tropical development and roughly 1 to 2°C above average (see Figure 3 below). On the other hand, the heat content of the upper ocean has not been particularly large over the last several days (see Figure 4), which implies that a storm as strong as Fantala could easily churn up cooler water. This makes it even more impressive that Fantala has managed to hang onto Category 4/5 strength for more than 48 hours, especially given its relatively slow motion.

After moving northwest for the last couple of days, Fantala is now crawling westward at about 4 knots as it embarks on a tight cyclonic loop that will turn its course around nearly 180 degrees to a southeast bearing. By late this week, Fantala may veer toward the southwest and could eventually approach Madagascar, though the JTWC projects it to be only a Category 1 or 2 cyclone by week’s end.


Figure 3. Departures from the seasonal norm (anomalies) in sea surface temperature across the globe, averaged for the period from March 13 to April 9, 2016. Image credit: NOAA/ESRL/PSD.


Figure 4. Oceanic heat content (OHC) in the upper part of the southwest Indian Ocean as of 06Z (2:00 am EDT) Monday, April 18, 2016. The forecast track of Fantala over the next 120 hours is outlined by hurricane symbols. Over the last several days, Fantala moved northwestward over an area of OHC of less than 35 kilojoules per square centimeter (the blue-green color on the map). Tropical cyclones are more likely to undergo rapid intensification when OHC is greater than 50 kilojoules per square cm. Fantala's initial strengthening from tropical storm to Cat 3 strength (Apr. 12 - 14] occurred around longitudes 65°E - 70°E, while Fantala was passing over heat content between 50 and 100 kilojoules per square cm. Image credit: RAMMB/Colorado State University.


A string of basin records for tropical cyclone strength
Many parts of the tropics have seen record-warm sea surface temperatures in 2015 and 2016, triggered by a strong El Niño on top of longer-term warming caused by human-produced greenhouse gases. These unusual readings have added fuel to the fire of tropical cyclone production. Along with Fantala’s record-setting performance in the Indian Ocean, two other ocean basins have seen their strongest cyclones on record in the past six months, as measured by 1-minute wind speeds confirmed in post-storm analyses. (Many agencies around the world calculate averages based on longer intervals, such as 10 minutes.)

Northeast Pacific: Hurricane Patricia, October 2015, 215 mph
Southwest Pacific: Tropical Cyclone Winston, February 2016, 180 mph



Figure 5. Residents of an apartment complex in the Greenspoint area of north Houston use an air mattress to evacuate their flooded homes on Monday, April 18, 2016. Image credit: AP Photo/David J. Phillip.

Houston walloped by massive flash flooding
At least two fatalities and more than 1200 high-water rescues were reported as the Houston area was socked on Monday morning by a huge mesoscale convective system (MCS) that drifted southeast across the area, dumping eye-popping amounts of rain: 6” - 8” over central Houston, with 12” - 18” common over the far western suburbs (see Figure 7). While individual thunderstorms often weaken after dark, the large mass of thunderstorms that makes up an MCS will often persist overnight and into the next morning, as the MCS cloud tops radiate heat to space and instability is enhanced. Countless roads and homes were flooded throughout the Houston area on Monday morning, and at one point power was out to more than 100,000 customers. City offices and mass transit lines were forced to close.


Figure 6. VIIRS infrared satellite imagery of the intense thunderstorms moving into the Houston area at 0835Z (3:35 am CDT) Monday, April 18, 2016. The Sabine River, separating Texas and Louisiana, can be seen in white against the east edge of the bright red, which denotes very cold cloud tops. Image credit: RAMMB/Colorado State University and Suomi NPP.


Figure 7. Rainfall amounts across Harris County, including the greater Houston area, for the 24 hours ending at 3:37 pm CDT on Monday, April 18, 2016. Image credit: Harris County Flood Control District.


The morning deluge drew some comparisons to Tropical Storm Allison, which devastated Houston as it lingered over Texas for several days in June 2001. Allison’s total rains were far heavier than today’s, topping 30” in places. However, today's flood was "flashier" than Allison, with extremely heavy rains over a short period. As noted by Capital Weather Gang, the 9.92" of rain at Houston Intercontinental Airport as of 3 pm CDT is the second heaviest calendar-day amount since airport record-keeping began in 1969, behind only the 10.34" recorded on June 26, 1989, during the city's "first" Tropical Storm Allison. It is also the second highest calendar-day total for any official Houston location going back to 1889, although it pales next to the nation's astounding 24-hour rainfall record of 43", recorded in Alvin, just south of Houston, on July 25, 1979.

Because the Houston area is so flat, water easily drains off paved areas and collects on the surface during high rainfall rates, so it doesn’t take an Allison-level event to produce widespread flooding. Houston’s west and northwest suburbs have experienced major growth over the last 10-20 years, which may be exacerbating the effect of a given rainstorm. As of midday Monday, the Buffalo Bayou in west Houston (Piney Point Village) was projected to crest at 61 feet, only about 3 inches short of its record 61.2-foot crest from March 4, 1992. However, as shown in Figure 7, it looks unlikely to hit that projection. Downtown, the Buffalo Bayou’s expected crest of 33.1 feet is far below the 42 feet observed in Allison and the 1935 record of 49 feet.

The complex of storms across Houston developed in weak upper-level flow near the edge of a sprawling upper-level low that brought 40” to 50” of snow across the foothills west of Denver, Colorado. At lower elevations, a foot or more of wet snow was recorded across large parts of the Front Range urban corridor. As expected, a rich stream of moist air from Texas to Nebraska led to streaks of very heavy rain throughout the Southern and Central Plains. Amounts over the weekend topped 7” west of Fort Worth, TX, and moderate to major river flooding is occurring over parts of southwest Oklahoma and northwest Texas. Amounts of 4” - 6” were common across southwest Nebraska.

We’ll be back on Tuesday with a new post.

Bob Henson


Figure 8. In west Houston (Piney Point Village), the Buffalo Bayou surged more than 28 feet in less than 18 hours. The floodwaters from Monday morning’s rain will fall short of reaching the 61-foot crest projected earlier Monday morning, although more rain is possible Monday night and later in the week. Image credit: NOAA/NWS Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service


Figure 9. Kaicee Crowley walks through floodwaters to get belongings out of her stranded car at the North Main Street exit off I-45 in Houston on Monday, April 18, 2016, as White Oak Bayou comes over its banks and floods the freeway. Image credit: Karen Warren/Houston Chronicle via AP.






The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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88.6F here today. Humidity was low, is only 20% right now.Currently 68.4F Couple of more Hot days. Slight Rain chance on Fri-Sat.
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Flood waters suck... To much can hurt you walking through them. From live power lines you can't see energizing the waters, to all sorts of critters you can see, to the diseases you can't... And chemicals you can't... Kind of like swimming in a South Dade Canal.

Anyone in the South that has ever taken a garden hose to an ant colony knows those suckers don't drown... and they come after you with a vengence.
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.


Wxgeek, you must be a Yankee....just wait until you run into some pissed-off Fire Ants; you get bit by them in large numbers, you are headed to the emergency room. I remember in Jungle Warfare School seeing one of my troops get bit by a little tiny ant (Central American Fire Ant) and almost going hysterical wanting to be Med-Evac'ed out of the jungle....and he was an 11B Infantryman, 2nd/503rd Infantry (Airborne)/101st Airborne Division. Fire Ant homes in Panama were as big as 10-15 feet in diameter and 2-4 feet high. And those ants could really cause you problems if they bit you.
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Quoting 120. CaneFreeCR:

I think it has a silent "C" and would be pronounced "GIMME". And the tractors won't be needed -- when the Greenland ice sheet slides off into the water it'll grind up the rock and plow up the dirt it makes, so crops can instantly be planted.


And since you'll be growing coconuts and tropical fruits in Greenland, you can just run your motorboat by what's left of the floating ice, scrape it up a bit with the motor, and make your own pina coladas.
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Quoting 136. swflurker:

Wilma is the mark to beat. If that happens, run for the hills!




I will.
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Wilma is the mark to beat. If that happens, run for the hills!

Quoting 112. washingtonian115:

The Atlantic...but I doubt we'll see a monster storm of epic proportions any time soon.
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No wonder we flooded. Look at the water vapor.
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Quoting 79. BaltimoreBrian:

I was born in mid 1970. Since 1970, Harris County TX has had considerable urban growth. How much role has that played in the latest flooding incident?

Harris County population

1970 1,741,912
1980 2,409,547
1990 2,818,199
2000 3,400,578
2010 4,092,459
2015 4,538,028

Note that interpolating the population data, Harris County's population has increased by more than 1 million since the Tropical Storm Allison flood disaster in 2001.

Some of the worst flooding today was on the new third beltway around Houston. It was just opened recently and today parts of it looked like a lake. Too much concrete, too few runoff retention pond for abatement of water runoff.
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By Wednesday, points to the N/NE of H-town are under the gun. Right?
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Quoting 53. JNFlori30A:

What the heck??
When I clicked on the link from the previous blog to this one I was surprised to see the warning dialogue box alerting me that the link was outside of WU??

"The link you clicked is taking you outside of Weather Underground.
Click Okay only if you trust this link:
https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/com ment.html?entrynum=3285"??

Looking at the latest unprecedented weather event with Houston flooding.. I had to wonder what my neck of the woods would look like with that much rain... Hurricanes no problem.. in the car days ahead of the forecast land fall.. having an MCS decide to park overhead and dump like a fire hose for hour after hour would be a real challenge with how flat it is in this part of NW FL...





NW FL has higher elevation and a quite a bit higher average yearly rainfall than Houston, and I think has better soil and drainage. Houston is prone to getting notable floods just from what is a run of the mill down pour here. A lot of it is because the drainage is poorly designed in some areas there, and the soil doesn't drain well.

The other issue is that Houston is in the crossover zone between the wetter east and drier west, so some years it's somewhat dry there, while other years it's much wetter. The lack of consistency in frequent heavy rainfall yet reliable return period of heavy rain events from time to time makes them prone as well.

Also, Houston lies downwind of the rockies, and still under the zone where strong instability/divergence zones occur like in the southern planes. Such setups if they stall, can provide strong synoptic support for persistent convection way beyond a typical heavy rain event. But because they are near the gulf, the amount of potential moisture such systems have to work with, is much higher than further north.

For this reason, Houston can be an odd place where it can go through extended periods of dry weather with very little rain, but then likewise have patterns where an absolute deluge can occur.

The record rain in Alvin Texas is a great example of such.
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.

You ever been stung by hundreds of ants before? It's not fun.
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Nightmare fodder?
Check!
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Quoting 86. BaltimoreBrian:

Fantala, another storm setting a new basin intensity record. It would be cool to see a new record set for the North Atlantic basin as well. Except that our highest heat content is in the northwest Caribbean sea and the Gulf of Mexico loop current. I'd rather not see a new intensity record set that close to land.


Charley was likely on track to doing so, but it ran out of land too quickly since it was moving NE at 18 mph, much faster than usual, and it was never far off the coast from the start. Had it been moving slower and taken a wider turn, it could have easily been a category 5 and making a run for strongest hurricane on record. I've never seen such perfect looking structure on radar before outside of Andrew, and it went from a category 2 to a 4 in just a few hours, it likely would have had a lot more in the tank...
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.






They do the Devil's bidding.

[Both images taken in Houston today]
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[deleted]
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.


Wandering around in flooded streets and fields after heavy down pours in the summer as a kid was something I often did growing up in the Tampa Bay area, and occasionally, I would really get torn up by floating piles of fire ants.

The ants originate from tropical rain forest areas where water levels rise dramatically at times, flooding the ant colonies. They've evolved to connect to each other to form super rafts with their bodies when their nests are flooded. Find a flooded field anywhere in the deep south after heavy rain, and you'll find floating masses of fire ants on the surface.

They are extra aggressive during that period if bumped into due to being exposed, and since they are all in one large mass, running into a pile can result in hundreds, if not thousands of stings.

Once as a kid, I ran into a large one walking through knee deep water, they crawled up my bathing suit, and I was stung hundreds if times, enough to actually make me sick.
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125. vis0
Quoting 20. johnmc318:

Let me guess, Global warming is to blame.. Just like the drought we had last summer, global warming there too.. This sire used to be a good place for info but it is so hard to find now scattered between the all the global warming talk. Yall are aware that we have had ice ages in the past on this planet.. we have also had warm spells.. its called balance. Just because we are not at the normal temp everyday does not mean anything. If we are below normal, then instead of global warming its called climate change. All of it is nothing but a political agenda. One that has caused me to go elsewhere for weather info.

A) You can still get good weather info here & FORECASTS TOO. They both have nothing to do with the comments section.
Lets test it "poopoo caca" there i posted something that makes no sense and IN SPANISH!. Now go to your local WxU weather page and see if the readings are legit (you might find a few typo errors but every site has that, just last month JB posted a 100 below zero temperature for Oklahoma. Everyone makes errors but if you think, you use those errors as a learning tool

B) Since this site has been mentioning GW/aGW for at least 12 years that means you have good control in not posting much for being so upset 24/12=2 per year.

3) You'll show all that i posted "3" instead of "C" but you cannot figure out that if the planet is warming for 30 years EVEN WITH THE SERIOUS COLD OUTBREAKS YOU"VE SEEN which means some serious warming must by countering those polar vortex outbreaks.

D)
Your statement of "Just because we are not at the normal temp everyday does not mean anything" shows that you don't even care to check your point of view 'cause if you want to show that things are "normal" then you'd present how everyday temperatures when collected over a month, year, decade are showing some cooling trend. It isn't, so you throw that area of observation out the window....if i'm not Mistaken or Misanthroptimist, is not the act of taking the days temperature important to prove whether its cooling or warming? How can you prove its all "normal" is you are not recording the daily temperatures?
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124. vis0
Quoting 21. NativeSun:

At this stage it's all opinions, nothing is proven yet at this time. It should be though in the near future, one way or the other.
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Nothing mysterious, it is all on the this page.
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Quoting 83. BaltimoreBrian:

I understood that the flag button stops working when two or more handles post from the same IP. ;)

Seriously, why would anyone think the flag button wasn't working unless they were signing into however many handles (5, 10, whatever) it takes to flag a comment out?


Interesting that you knew that information..I personally think the flag works for whoever is doing the flagging and whoever is the mod..

Also your reasoning could be said the same for people who cry about log in errors because they "signed" out..could it be they are signing out due to multiple handles?

Every time I see someone cry about sign in errors I think they just told on themselves..

Just came back to post as I just finished our taxes..paying the govt is never fun.. :(
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Quoting 110. BaltimoreBrian:

Let's review. Haiyan was probably the strongest typhoon on record in the northwestern Pacific. Patricia in the northeastern Pacific. Pam and Winston in the south Pacific. Fantala in the south Indian ocean, and the Socotra storms last year. How many hurricane basins left?
Us?
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Quoting 105. BaltimoreBrian:

Quoting RobertWC
How about the Greenland Mineral Investment Company? As the ice retreats more and more mineral deposits exposed. Stock symbol GMIC (pronounced 'gimmick')
I think it has a silent "C" and would be pronounced "GIMME". And the tractors won't be needed -- when the Greenland ice sheet slides off into the water it'll grind up the rock and plow up the dirt it makes, so crops can instantly be planted.
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Radar, satellite, and current conditions indicate that upper level support is not quite as impressive as this morning. Mid to upper level moisture advection is not quite as deep as earlier. Paired with that, the atmosphere still seems pretty worked over. Pwats are also down by about 1/2 an inch compared to earlier in the day. Houston could still see some more rain tonight but I think that breaks in the precipitation and much lower rain rates will limit the totals. Thing is, any rain will aggravate the flooding situation and drain off. Another interesting note is the ECMWF suggests we could see yet another round Tuesday evening/ Wednesday. And that's my worry for tonight: What do the models say about strength and severity of this round? Will it be anything like what we went through Monday morning?
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Quoting 83. BaltimoreBrian:

I understood that the flag button stops working when two or more handles post from the same IP. ;)

Seriously, why would anyone think the flag button wasn't working unless they were signing into however many handles (5, 10, whatever) it takes to flag a comment out?
Perhaps because they don't use it often and recall that, in some previous incarnation of wu, the flag button changed color when used, and now it does not.
...

Good night, Gracie.

(edited after posting)
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Once again , "The Energy Capital of the World " drowns in Climate Change,
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115. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
...and the Socotra storms last year.


Gonu should still be the strongest cyclone in the northern Indian ocean
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Orleans Severe Watches & WarningsNOAA Weather Radio

Watches & WarningsCoastal Flood WarningIssued: 3:36 PM CDT Apr. 18, 2016 – National Weather Service

... Coastal Flood Warning now in effect until 7 am CDT Tuesday...

* coastal flooding... Hancock County Mississippi coast and east
facing shores of southeast Louisiana extending from the Pearl
River to the Mississippi River... including areas surrounding
lakes Pontchartrain and Maurepas. Areas bordering Lake Pontchartrain outside of the levee protection will likely see the most inundation.

* Timing... through Tuesday morning.

* Impacts... tides around 3 feet above normal will lead to
inundation of low lying coastal roadways and areas not
typically subject to coastal flooding during high tides
outside protection levees.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A coastal Flood Warning means that flooding is occurring or
imminent. Coastal residents in the warned area should be alert
for rising water... and take appropriate action to protect life
and property
																	

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 112. washingtonian115:

The Atlantic...but I doubt we'll see a monster storm of epic proportions any time soon.


Agreed.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 110. BaltimoreBrian:

Let's review. Haiyan was probably the strongest typhoon on record in the northwestern Pacific. Patricia in the northeastern Pacific. Pam and Winston in the south Pacific. Fantala in the south Indian ocean, and the Socotra storms last year. How many hurricane basins left?
The Atlantic...but I doubt we'll see a monster storm of epic proportions any time soon.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Let's review. Haiyan was probably the strongest typhoon on record in the northwestern Pacific. Patricia in the northeastern Pacific. Pam and Winston in the south Pacific. Fantala in the south Indian ocean, and the Socotra storms last year. How many hurricane basins left?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
109. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Argentine Ants?!
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

Fire ants. They float, and will find anything to float on. The bites are miserable.
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Quoting 106. wxgeek723:

I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.
Fireants gather up in big balls in floodwaters. Big medicine ball sized things. And they are angry. Don't pet those ants.

wundermail, Trent.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
I can understand chemicals and snakes but...ants?

* ADDITIONALLY... RESIDENTS IN THE WARNED AREA ARE STRONGLY
DISCOURAGED FROM PLAYING OR WADING INTO FLOOD WATERS. NOT ONLY IS
IT INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH OF FLOOD
WATERS...BUT CHEMICALS... SNAKES... AND ANTS IN ADDITION TO OTHER
HAZARDS MAY ALSO BE IN FLOOD WATERS.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 100. RobertWC:

There will be zero tractor dealerships in Greenland for the next 10,000 years.
How about the Greenland Mineral Investment Company? As the ice retreats more and more mineral deposits exposed. Stock symbol GMIC (pronounced 'gimmick')
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Doctors issue call to combat climate change
By Dennis Thompson, HealthDay News | April 18, 2016 at 5:21 PM

MONDAY, April 18, 2016 -- Climate change is already harming people's health by promoting illnesses linked to warmer temperatures and changing weather patterns, a leading group of U.S. doctors says in a new position paper.

As a result, the American College of Physicians (ACP) is calling for "aggressive, concerted" action to fight climate change by curbing man-made greenhouse gas emissions.

Respiratory illnesses, heat stroke and infectious diseases like Zika virus, dengue fever and cholera are flourishing as global temperatures rise, said Dr. Wayne Riley, president of the college.

"Our climate is already changing and people are already being harmed. If we don't begin to address climate change, we're going to see more and more manifestations of these health problems," Riley said.

"There is clear, compelling scientific consensus that climate change is real," he added. "There is no dispute."
Link
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Quoting 102. BaltimoreBrian:

I hope you get into the Hurricane Hunters Kori.


That's one of my aspirations, so I would obviously agree. ;p
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I hope you get into the Hurricane Hunters Kori.
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101. pureet1948
1:26 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Quoting 88. Patrap:

we're looking at another round of thunderstorms with the possibility of more flooding overnight.






Can you post a radar with storm tracks for me?
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100. RobertWC
1:26 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
There will be zero tractor dealerships in Greenland for the next 10,000 years.
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99. pureet1948
1:25 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Quoting 96. justmehouston:



Pureet, I can agree with your number one ...not qualified enough to answer number two.
I just got done steam cleaning up after last nights rain ...urg!

I dont think its going to be more powerful or even as long lasting ...but thats just me.
Positive thinking.


Nexrad radar has them all dying before they reach Houston region. Or that's its story.
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98. KoritheMan
1:24 AM GMT on April 19, 2016

Quoting 96. justmehouston:




I dont think its going to be more powerful or even as long lasting ...but thats just me.
Positive thinking.
Which isn't scientific, I'll have you know! :P
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
97. RobertWC
1:21 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
96. justmehouston
1:18 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Quoting 85. pureet1948:

Dear JustmeHouston:

1. SE Texas radar looks concerning to me. It looks like E-W bands trying to setup to the west, with storms training in them.

2. Could the clearing and "sun" coming through have contributed to the development? If so, does this mean even more powerful thunderstorms than hit Houston last night?

Your friend,
Pureet1948


Pureet, I can agree with your number one ...not qualified enough to answer number two.
I just got done steam cleaning up after last nights rain ...urg!

I dont think its going to be more powerful or even as long lasting ...but thats just me.
Positive thinking.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
95. RobertWC
1:16 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
74. Xyrus2000
12:17 AM GMT on April 19, 2016

Thanks for answering DocBen. It jarred my memory banks.

Quoting 4. DocBen:
Younger Dryas
It is named after an indicator genus, the alpine-tundra wildflower Dryas octopetala.

Somewhere on the web are Dr. Richard Alley's remarks about his research on the Younger Dryas. One of the most interesting climate change events we have ever uncovered. Assuming you know nothing about it, in short :
As the last ice age was dying , very, very large lakes formed in North American. They had ice dams holding them back. One of best understood is Lake Missoula.
On the East coast Our current ocean circulation was being established. Ice was melting, the world was warming. Then one of these ice dams failed, lakes gave loose and fresh water rushed into the North .Atlantic.
We're talking about Lake Superior sized lakes.

And here's where Alley's work counts in Greenland. The event was only from 12,900 to c. 11,700 calendar years ago . When it came on , the Northern Hemisphere , became very dry, and very cold. very fast. When it ended , it when back to where the Milankovitch Cycles were driving it. A warmer world. But the changes Alley found were on the order of 11F degrees in 10 years.

So there is great concern , about Greenland. And great discharges of fresh water into the North Atlantic. Greenland is not an island, it is chain of islands holding an huge ice cube in the middle.




Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
94. hotroddan
1:16 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
South Austin only got about 2 inches of rain. But in Feyette County southeast of there, they got about 13 inches of rain.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
93. KoritheMan
1:15 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
It's also worth noting that Fantala peaked near the point of recurvature, a well-documented point for tropical cyclone plateaus. The reason why this relationship exists is fairly obvious.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
91. KoritheMan
1:12 AM GMT on April 19, 2016
Quoting 86. BaltimoreBrian:

Fantala, another storm setting a new basin intensity record. It would be cool to see a new record set for the North Atlantic basin as well. Except that our highest heat content is in the northwest Caribbean sea and the Gulf of Mexico loop current. I'd rather not see a new intensity record set that close to land.


Last year I would've said go for it. This year I'm indifferent because I don't have the money I did last year to actually go to the coast.
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Cat 6 lead authors: WU cofounder Dr. Jeff Masters (right), who flew w/NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990, & WU meteorologist Bob Henson, @bhensonweather