Winston's 180 mph Winds in Fiji: Southern Hemisphere's Strongest Storm on Record

By: Jeff Masters , 6:47 PM GMT on February 20, 2016

The strongest storm in recorded history for the Southern Hemisphere--mighty Category 5 Tropical Cyclone Winston--smashed through the islands of Fiji Friday night and Saturday morning with top sustained winds estimated at 180 mph (note: Winston's top winds were originally estimated at 185 mph, but these were reduced to 180 mph in post-analysis.) These winds vaulted Winston into a tie as the third strongest landfalling tropical cyclone in world recorded history (see Figure 3). Winston began its march at Category 5 strength through the Fiji Islands beginning at 18 UTC (1 pm EST) Friday. At that time, Winston had 165 mph winds as it moved westwards over the small Fiji island of Vanua Balavu (population 1,200). The island's airport was in the western eyewall of Winston, and at 18 UTC measured 10-minute average winds of 106 mph (roughly equivalent to 120 mph winds using the U.S. 1-minute averaging time.) Winston continued to intensify, then crashed ashore on the Fiji island of Koro (population 4,500) at peak strength--sustained winds of 185 mph--near 02 UTC Saturday (9 pm EST Friday.) This is the third strongest landfall by any tropical cyclone, globally, in recorded history. Only Super Typhoon Haiyan's 190 mph winds at landfall in 2013 in Samar, Philippines, and Super Typhoon Meranti's 190 mph winds at landfall in Itbayat Island, Philippines have been rated higher. After likely demolishing most of Koro with a long period of sustained winds of EF4 tornado strength, Winston's northern (weaker) eyewall brushed the south coast of Fiji's second largest island, Vanua Levu. The city of Nambouwalu on the south coast of Vanua Levu reported 10-minute sustained winds of 121 mph at 06 UTC Saturday (roughly equivalent to Category 4 winds of 135 mph using the U.S. 1-minute averaging time.) Winston then wobbled more to the west-southwest, possibly due to interaction with the high terrain of the two largest islands of Fiji. Maintaining winds of 180 mph, Winston slammed ashore along the northeast coast of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu in Rakiraki, a district of close to 30,000 people, near 07 UTC Saturday. The eye of Winston travelled westwards along the north coast of Viti Levu for two hours, pounding the entire north coast of the island with the strongest part of the storm, the southern eyewall. When Winston finally emerged from the island near 09 UTC Saturday, the storm was slightly weaker, but still had Category 5 winds of 160 mph. At that time, the edge of Winston's south eyewall moved over the second largest city in Fiji, Lautoka (population 80,000). The top sustained winds at the Lautoka tide station were 83 mph, gusting to 110 mph. These 10-minute average winds imply that at least Category 2 hurricane conditions (95 - 100 mph 1-minute averaged winds) were likely experienced there (thanks go to wunderground member Carnivorous for this link.) Damage to Fiji is going to be severe to catastrophic, but it will be several days before the true scope of the destruction is realized.


Figure 1. Radar image from the Fiji weather service showing Tropical Cyclone Winston at 07 UTC Saturday, February 20, 2016. At the time, Winston was making landfall on Fiji's main island of Viti Levu as a Category 5 storm with 180 mph winds and a 915 mb central pressure.


Figure 2. Visible MODIS image from NASA's Terra satellite of Tropical Cyclone Winston taken at 0300 UTC February 20 (10 pm EST February 19), 2016. At the time, WInston was a Category 5 storm with 185 mph winds, and its eye was over Koro Island on Fiji. Image credit: NASA.

Winston the strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Southern Hemisphere
Winston's 180 mph sustained winds at its peak intensity at 00 UTC February 20 are tied for the highest for any Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone ever rated by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC). The other 180 mph cyclones were Cyclone Zoe of 2002 and Cyclone Monica of 2006. Winston's lowest central pressure as estimated by the Fiji Meteorological Service was 915 mb at 06 UTC February 20. This ranks Winston as the 29th most intense tropical cyclone in the Southern Hemisphere by pressure. The record lowest pressure is 890 mb by Cyclone Zoe of 2002. Winston's top winds were higher than its central pressure might imply because it was a relatively small cyclone, so the wind-generating difference in pressure was packed into a small area. Winston joins a very select club of Category 5 storms ever recorded to churn the South Pacific waters east of Australia. Since satellite records began in 1970 (with high-quality satellite images only available since 1990), just eleven Cat 5s (including Winston) have been observed in the South Pacific east of Australia. Only two of the ten previous Cat 5s have made landfall as a Category 5. The most recent was last year's Cyclone Pam, which was at its peak strength, with 165-mph Category 5 winds, when it passed over several small Vanuatu Islands to the north of Efate Island, Vanuatu's most populous island. The other Category 5 landfall was by Cyclone Zoe of 2002, which made a direct hit as a Category 5 storm on several small islands in the Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands with a total population of 1700. There was one other close call, though: the eye of Category 5 Tropical Cyclone Olaf passed 15 miles east of Ta'u, American Samoa, on February 16, 2005, but caused minimal damage.


Figure 3. The most intense world tropical cyclones at landfall, using the advisories taken from the National Hurricane Center in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) for the rest of the world's oceans. Both agencies use 1-minute averaging times for their advisories, as opposed to the 10-minute averaging time used to report wind speeds by most international weather agencies and at most international airports. Note that Super Typhoon Haiyan was originally assessed to have 195 mph winds at landfall by JTWC, but these were reduced to 190 mph after a post-season reanalysis. Also, Hurricane Camille's winds at landfall have also been reduced in a recent reanalysis, from 190 mph to 175 mph.


Figure 4. Track of all Category 5 storms in the South Pacific (east of 135°E) since satellite records began in 1970. The strongest tropical cyclones in the Joint Typhoon Warning Center’s records are Zoe (2002/2003) and Monica (2006), which topped out with 180 mph winds. Image credit: Michael Lowry, TWC.

Forecast for Winston
Winston has moved past Fiji, and is no longer a high wind threat to the islands. Some residual heavy rains will continue over the western portion of Viti Levu on Saturday, though. Winston will likely weaken to Category 4 strength and head southwards during the remainder of the weekend, with no other islands in its path, thankfully. The cyclone may restrengthen slightly on Monday before a more significant weakening takes hold.

Fiji's tropical cyclone history
Category 4 Tropical Cyclone Evan of December 17, 2012 walloped Fiji with sustained winds of 135 mph, as the storm's southern eyewall--the most intense part of the storm--brought hurricane conditions to a long stretch of the north and west coasts of Fiji's main island, Viti Levu. According to a database maintained by NOAA's Coastal Service Center, Evan was the strongest tropical cyclone on record to affect Fiji's main island, with records going back to 1941 (however, more accurate satellite records extend back to only about 1990.) Evan did $109 million in damage (2012 dollars) to Fiji, making it the second most destructive storm in their history. The most devastating cyclone to affect Fiji in recorded history was Category 2 Cyclone Kina of January 1993, which killed 23 people and did $100 million in damage (1993 dollars.) The only deadlier storm than Kina was Category 3 Cyclone Eric of 1985, which made a direct hit on the capital of Suva, killing 25.


Figure 5. Tracks of all Category 1 and stronger tropical cyclones to pass within 100 miles of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu since 1941. Evan of 2012 (Category 4 with 135 mph winds) was the strongest cyclone on record to affect Fiji, but Winston of 2016 was much stronger. Image credit: NOAA's Coastal Service Center.

Links
Radar images from the Fiji weather service
Long radar loops of Winston
Satellite imagery from NOAA/NESDIS.
Fiji weather observations from wunderground.
Long Himawari-8 satellite animation in MP4 or animated GIF format.
Fiji Met Service Facebook page.


Cyclone Winston: Incredible conditions in Savusavu, Fiji, February 20, 2016. (Thanks go to wunderground member barabmz for posting this video in the comments.)

Jeff Masters


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 78 - 28

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6Blog Index

Quoting 53. Gearsts:

Joe Bastardi ‏@BigJoeBastardi Feb 19 Pennsylvania, USA
JAMSTEC shows flip to La Nina by fall, N Atlantic cooling, Cool enso, warm MDR atlantic =Big ACE hurricane season


Scott? What do you think ?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 74. hotroddan:

Why are tropical cyclones in the Pacific ocean stronger than those in the Atlantic or Indian ocean? Is the water temperature higher in the Pacific?


Atmospheric Pressure in the pacific is lower than the Atlantic and yes Warmer waters.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 12. Webberweather53:

In case anyone may have missed it, here is my first ever weather broadcast for the Broadcast Meteorology Club here @ NCSU I completed early this past week. Although I'm certainly seeking a route in research, I thought that joining this club would not only look good on a resume, but would be a fantastic first-hand experience to see what broadcasting is like, & of course I wanted to have some fun in the process. I hope I don't sound too boring, lol. BTW, all of my meteorology buddies refer to me as "Climo", because they think I'm absolutely nuts wrt ENSO & intraseasonal-interdecadal variability hence the "Climo's corner" segment..

Link


From an outsider's point of view:

Great Job!

Tips:

1] Practice losing the 'ums, uhs, ahs'. Having that presentation control will help you everywhere you go!

2] When on camera, try to look into it a little more often, and every now and then crack a smile ... as though you and your viewer shared a secret.

3] You might take a single semester speech course. It is not that your vocals are bad, but they could easily be substantially shined up. Again such a thing will help you through-out your life.

and then,

4] I don't know how the markets work, but that is certain to change, at any rate; I don't see why you couldn't market your weather to any city in the country... especially with the availability of web cams: All the materials you need are right in front of you to put it together for Boston, Chicago, Seattle ... though it would be able to crack the smaller markets more easily of course.

Seriously: Your club could probably through together a corporation offering a variety of weather web-casting products... of varying lengths, to a variety of audiences, delivered on a variety of platforms. Doing it by bitcoin might make getting your money easier, but you'd have to have someone on the marketing team ready to make it easy for your customer to get and use bitcoin.

Oh, and thanks! I don't see much on here (understandably] about things to come in my corner of the country.... Nice to be able to hope for more mild weather here!

Best of Luck!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Gaurdian's current coverage of Fiji:

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Why are tropical cyclones in the Pacific ocean stronger than those in the Atlantic or Indian ocean? Is the water temperature higher in the Pacific?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Most of us know we're poking at the dragon, but sometimes we fail to grasp just how big the dragon is. This one made me gulp -

Colossal Antarctic ice-shelf collapse followed last ice age

"This continent-enveloping ice sheet extended all the way to the continental shelf, and in western Antarctica it filled the entire Ross Sea basin." ............................ In western Antarctica, the Ross Sea is characterized by a continental shelf that extends nearly 1,000 miles from the coast and is as much as 3,500 feet deep. Anderson said the geologic record shows that as recently as 18,000 years ago the entire Ross basin was filled with ice that was so thick and heavy it was grounded on the seafloor all the way to the edge of the continental shelf.

"We found that about 10,000 years ago, this thick, grounded ice sheet broke apart in dramatic fashion," Anderson said. "The evidence shows that an armada of icebergs—each at least twice as tall as the Empire State Building—was pushed out en masse. We know this because this part of the Ross Sea is about 550 meters (1,804 feet) deep, and the icebergs were so large and so tightly packed that they gouged huge furrows into the seafloor as they moved north."


Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
How high up are you Dakster? At least the days are a decent length now.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 67. Gearsts:



Ooh thanks!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I thought that during El Niño years the western Pacific was cooler than normal as the warm surface water moved eastwards. During this El Niño we have had record strong systems hit Vanuatu (Cyclone Pam) and now Fiji (Cyclone Winston). Is such strong tropical cyclone activity in the southwestern Pacific something new for El Niño years?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 63. tiggerhurricanes2001:


Thatis true. I actually consider 2004 lanfalls to Florida worse than 2005 IMO. Florida got hit literally back to back. But i mean if u think about it, the way Nino 1+2 is falling, this may soon or already be a modoki. JMO.
Is not and won't be.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I see that I got back to Anchorage just in time... nasty winter storm coming. I'm at the "higher elevations" too...

* SNOW...15 TO 30 INCHES AT HIGHER ELEVATIONS AND 5 TO 15 INCHES ELSEWHERE. HIGHER AMOUNTS ARE POSSIBLE.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 60. tiggerhurricanes2001:


You can't help but say that this weakening el nino looks a tad bit modoki. Is it common for weakening el ninos to look a little modoki in appearance.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting 52. whitewabit:

Hope the People of Fiji were hunkered down ..

Went through Camille in Biloxi, Ms in 69 .. many will relive this day every year for the rest of their lives .. It causes a form of PTSD just like soldiers who have been in wars have ..

I was in Mobile in 69 for Camille and in Polplarville,Ms for Frederick when it came into Mobile .....   Dad and Mom moved at the right times   :-)

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Doomed El Faro captain said "clock is ticking" in final call

"We had a hull breach, a scuttle blew open during a storm," Davidson told an operator in a follow-up call minutes later, his voice calm but urgent. "We have water down in three holds with a heavy list. We've lost the main propulsion unit, the engineers cannot get it going."

The operator asked the captain for his satellite phone number and to spell the name of the vessel, at which point Davidson sounded frustrated saying "the clock is ticking" and that he needed to speak to a company official. He can also be heard calling to crew members to ask what they're seeing down below.


Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
A quite beautiful day today with a mix of sun and clouds. Highs right around 70F. Beginning to wonder about the flood potential next week. Maybe even a few severe storms Tuesday night-Wednesday? Will wait and see.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 61. BahaHurican:

@ tiggerh....

That 2004 Modiki wasn't all that friendly to the ATL, especially FL ....

Thatis true. I actually consider 2004 lanfalls to Florida worse than 2005 IMO. Florida got hit literally back to back. But i mean if u think about it, the way Nino 1+2 is falling, this may soon or already be a modoki. JMO.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The few pics I've looked at so far show tree damage consistent with cat 2 [maybe low end cat 3] winds; larger limbs and weaker trees down; smaller limbs snapped off. Reminds me of Frances damage here.



BTW, is there some reason why it's taking so long for posts to load? I waited 9 minutes after I posted this message to be able to modify it ....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
@ tiggerh....

That 2004 Modiki wasn't all that friendly to the ATL, especially FL ....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 53. Gearsts:

Joe Bastardi ‏@BigJoeBastardi Feb 19 Pennsylvania, USA
JAMSTEC shows flip to La Nina by fall, N Atlantic cooling, Cool enso, warm MDR atlantic =Big ACE hurricane season

You can't help but say that this weakening el nino looks a tad bit modoki. Is it common for weakening el ninos to look a little modoki in appearance.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 51. hydrus:

Yep..I was surprised how many there were. I knew they could be hit, but not that often.
FIJI - The Bahamas of the South Pacific

You get my drift .....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 38. Neapolitan:

As seems to happen with almost every landfalling tropical cyclone, first news/pictures, because they generally come from lesser hit areas, seldom if every reflect the true extent and depth of the damage. That usually comes a day or two later--and it's usually shocking.
Was about to say early reports are going [pretty logically] to come from areas with less damage [and for example, still w/ power and internet access]. I want to see Kobo... and the earlier hit island with which communications were lost early on.

Thinking back about our recent hurricane encounter; the worst pictures, those of Crooked Island, didn't make it to the internet for nearly 2 weeks. With island nations, you can't even get to the affected areas until the sea state is sufficiently calm to voyage there. Airports are often non-functional for the first 72 - 96 hours post-landfall.

I have a feeling we will be seeing worse imagery. I just hope the loss of life remains at the one posted. We were fortunate locally in October; I wish that same good fortune to Fiji post-Winston.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
And so it begins!!!!



MESOSCALE DISCUSSION 0117
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
0515 PM CST SAT FEB 20 2016

AREAS AFFECTED...PARTS OF CNTRL/E CNTRL MO AND ADJACENT SWRN IL

CONCERNING...SEVERE POTENTIAL...WATCH UNLIKELY

VALID 202315Z - 210115Z

PROBABILITY OF WATCH ISSUANCE...20 PERCENT

SUMMARY...WITH SEVERE WEATHER POTENTIAL EXPECTED TO BE LIMITED TO
MOSTLY MARGINAL SEVERE HAIL...AND PROBABLY CONFINED IN BOTH AREA AND
TIME...A WATCH IS NOT CURRENTLY ANTICIPATED. BUT TRENDS WILL
CONTINUE TO BE MONITORED.

DISCUSSION...CONVECTIVE CELLS ARE DEEPENING ACROSS THE LOWER
MISSOURI VALLEY...WITHIN AN APPARENT ZONE OF BROADER LARGE-SCALE
ASCENT ASSOCIATED WITH WARM ADVECTION BASED AROUND 700 MB. MOISTURE
RETURN TO THIS ZONE...AT LEAST NORTH OF A VICHY/FARMINGTON LINE...IS
ELEVATED ABOVE RELATIVELY DRY BOUNDARY LAYER...BUT STILL
CONTRIBUTING TO INCREASING CAPE WHICH MODELS SUGGEST WILL BECOME
SUPPORTIVE OF INCREASING THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY THROUGH THE 00-03Z
TIME FRAME.

BENEATH 40-50 KT WESTERLY MID/UPPER FLOW...DEEP LAYER SHEAR IS
POTENTIALLY SUPPORTIVE OF SUPERCELL STRUCTURES...WHICH WILL ENHANCE
POTENTIAL FOR MAINLY SEVERE HAIL IN THE MORE SUSTAINED STORMS. THIS
THREAT IS PROBABLY HIGHEST WITHIN A NARROW CORRIDOR WEST THROUGH
EAST OF VICHY...INTO AND EAST OF THE FARMINGTON AREA. THIS COINCIDES
WITH THE NORTHERN GRADIENT OF THE HIGHER PRECIPITABLE WATER...WHERE
SURFACE DEW POINTS IN THE MID 50S ARE CONTRIBUTING WEAK BOUNDARY
LAYER BASED INSTABILITY...AND CLOUD-BEARING LAYER SHEAR IS LIKELY
MAXIMIZED.

WARMER MID-LEVEL TEMPERATURES AND WEAKER LARGE-SCALE ASCENT MAY
CONTINUE TO PRECLUDE CONVECTIVE DEVELOPMENT TO THE SOUTH OF THIS
REGION.

..KERR/HART.. 02/20/2016


ATTN...WFO...PAH...LSX...SGF...EAX...

LAT...LON 39399271 39179129 38688970 37918958 37469046 37759149
37859252 38319292 39399271
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 55. whitewabit:



I was 20 .. in the Air Force stationed at Keesler AFB ..


Must be so vivid after all this time. Awful how that stretch of coastline saw two 920 mb and under storms in a span of under 40 years. Makes me feel fortunate for what I have, living in a hurricane prone area myself.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 54. win1gamegiantsplease:



How old were you when it hit?


I was 20 .. in the Air Force stationed at Keesler AFB ..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 52. whitewabit:

Hope the People of Fiji were hunkered down ..

Went through Camille in Biloxi, Ms in 69 .. many will relive this day every year for the rest of their lives .. It causes a form of PTSD just like soldiers who have been in wars have ..


How old were you when it hit?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Joe Bastardi ‏@BigJoeBastardi Feb 19 Pennsylvania, USA
JAMSTEC shows flip to La Nina by fall, N Atlantic cooling, Cool enso, warm MDR atlantic =Big ACE hurricane season
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hope the People of Fiji were hunkered down ..

Went through Camille in Biloxi, Ms in 69 .. many will relive this day every year for the rest of their lives .. It causes a form of PTSD just like soldiers who have been in wars have ..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 50. bwi:

Just for storm geeks, I was right (I think) about there having been a severe cyclone in 1965. Old timers on Kadavu talked about it, and it's referenced in:

M. J. Cooper (1965) Destruction of Marine Flora and Fauna in Fiji Caused by the Hurricane of February 1965 Pacific Sciences 20:137-141

which I found a reference to in Proceedings of the 11th Annual Pacific Climate (PACLIM) Workshop (California, 1994) edited by Caroline Issacs and Vera Tharp

Not seeing it in the track maps above...
Yep..I was surprised how many there were. I knew they could be hit, but not that often.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
50. bwi
Just for storm geeks, I was right (I think) about there having been a severe cyclone in 1965. Old timers on Kadavu talked about it, and it's referenced in:

M. J. Cooper (1965) Destruction of Marine Flora and Fauna in Fiji Caused by the Hurricane of February 1965 Pacific Sciences 20:137-141

which I found a reference to in Proceedings of the 11th Annual Pacific Climate (PACLIM) Workshop (California, 1994) edited by Caroline Issacs and Vera Tharp

Not seeing it in the track maps above...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
BREAKING NEWS!!! Clin-Ton won Nevada!!! Which means Epic Bernie Sanders is likely in 2nd place!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 47. Xyrus2000:



It was done to be humorous, not to be condescending. Sheesh. I thought a little levity might brighten up what has been a rather down day on the blog.
Exactly..I know I get the blues when I see peoples lives ripped apart.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 31. StAugustineFL:



I don't understand why I was quoted since I was giving an "atta boy". Perhaps your silly mood? Webber did a great job. Shall we be expecting Xyrus2000 video's anytime soon?




It was done to be humorous, not to be condescending. Sheesh. I thought a little levity might brighten up what has been a rather down day on the blog.

Edit: As far as being a broadcaster, I have neither the looks, time, nor talent to do be one. I'll be in the dark back closet writing the code and running the infrastructure.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
46. vis0

Quoting 38. Neapolitan:

As seems to happen with almost every landfalling tropical cyclone, first news/pictures, because they generally come from lesser hit areas, seldom if every reflect the true extent and depth of the damage. That usually comes a day or two later--and it's usually shocking.
and if i may add the present mindset of many news watchers (maybe even some news sites) is change the headlines every other day. By the time reporters can reach the areas that had roads destroyed its post-storm day 3 (as with 2015 Patricia in Mx.) and that will be overshadowed by another "fresher" news worthy (to some news organizations & some watchers) story and if that next story gets more attention in the public the worse damaged areas due to WINSTON are not seen by the amount of people that saw the outer edge of the damaged areas.

Sent an idea to google & yahoo ~6 years ago in where people can drag & drop any news title/headline into a slide in tab from googles/yahoo's news page in where any updates on that selected new story remains as the top story IN THAT TAB even if it is no longer on googles or yahoos top headlines section. In this manner readers can easily follow the latest on that story as the TAB blinks when an update is created. In this manner instead of having to scroll back to the visited pages which odds are have changed or discontinued the original link the readers sees the blinking tab and clicks on that. (anyone wants to pass it to them again go ahead)

In reality its also the lazy brain of today's society -i'm at times a culprit- why say that?
as i remember grandparents forcing their hard working fingers to turn real newspaper pages 5, 10, 20 pages to stay up with yesterdays top news stories, so why not click a keypad 2 or 6 times to yesterdays headlines on pg 6 of a search?.

Not to be confused with personalizing an google account i mean linking to other news sources updates via googles main page so the google main page display your saves as an equally important headline next to googles top new headline.

instead of tomorrow seeing

PRIMARY RESULTS only
if you choose to follow Washington Post as to WINSTON you read 
PRIMARY RESULTS | USA Today  ----  HURR WINSTON new images of more devastation | Washington Post

BACK to sPACs 2016 WINSTON
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
45. vis0
roughdraft postedclicked wrong button i guess
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 43. Sfloridacat5:



Yeah, it appears a lot of the videos we've seen so far are coming from areas that didn't get into the eye wall of the Cyclone. Any of the areas directly impacted by the southern eye wall will have significant damage. You wouldn't even be able to safely make a video while experiencing the southern eye wall of Cyclone Winston.
May not be able to reach them.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 38. Neapolitan:

As seems to happen with almost every landfalling tropical cyclone, first news/pictures, because they generally come from lesser hit areas, seldom if every reflect the true extent and depth of the damage. That usually comes a day or two later--and it's usually shocking.


Yeah, it appears a lot of the videos we've seen so far are coming from areas that didn't get into the eye wall of the Cyclone. Any of the areas directly impacted by the southern eye wall will have significant damage. You wouldn't even be able to safely make a video while experiencing the southern eye wall of Cyclone Winston.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Quoting 31. StAugustineFL:



I don't understand why I was quoted since I was giving an "atta boy". Perhaps your silly mood? Webber did a great job. Shall we be expecting Xyrus2000 video's anytime soon?




I could put one of mine up. Well the only one of mine up, I did the local weather when I was 7 or 8 and it's on VHS at my folks place somewhere. But I'd like to live on with a little bit of my dignity.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
Ugh....this makes me want to vomit. That video from Savusavu is the pier/yacht club where I was not more than a year and half ago. So many friends, acquaintances....An incredible little city. Godspeed to everyone there. :*(
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 29. PedleyCA:


That one Week in January was pretty much it. 2.85" and 3.28" so far this year.



Yup, 3 substantial storms first week of January with a few under 1/10th inch of rain sandwiched in between them. 1 storm to end on the 31st got me to just over 7" rain in January 2016. February been bone dry with 1 storm 0.04" a few days ago. Hoping for a Miracle March! At least where the water is stored has been getting near normals of rain and snow.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 34. MeteorologistTV:

How does such a strong storm hit with such little damage?.You would think a 95mph hurricane hit Fiji from the pictures.
As seems to happen with almost every landfalling tropical cyclone, first news/pictures, because they generally come from lesser hit areas, seldom if every reflect the true extent and depth of the damage. That usually comes a day or two later--and it's usually shocking.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
As I was watching the video, I was thinking, "Man, how dumb...They should have evacuated if they knew a Cat 5 was coming."

....Then it hit me
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 29. PedleyCA:


That one Week in January was pretty much it. 2.85" and 3.28" so far this year.

I feel your pain. Friday my rain gauge recorded 4.92 inches in a 24 hour period, after a week of steady rain every day. And that isn't even a record. Jist normal "not-so-rainy season" weather.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
How does such a strong storm hit with such little damage?.You would think a 95mph hurricane hit Fiji from the pictures.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
33. vis0

Still Caribbean picking up from last years flooding.  Now we see
Islands
on the other side of the globe getting ready in starting to figure out
how to start clean up. Hope the more frequent disastrous storms to
extreme weather swings droughts to deluges (you see more frequently on
news reports or barbamz and other WxU worldwide weather watchers) wakes people
up.  If not soon
sadly when these storms begin to hit "ones" home or country and the
costs of fixing up instead of preventing hits ones front door i hope one
stays safe then think was it worth saving some bucks now to loose
(hopefully only) more bucks later.


In the big picture not a top of the list thing but i credit:: hydrus for 1977 Anita reference and focus, back on the important::

(deliberate double post)
Still Caribbean picking up from last years flooding.  Now we see Islands
on the other side of the globe getting ready in starting to figure out
how to start clean up. Hope the more frequent disastrous storms to
extreme weather swings droughts to deluges (you see more frequently on news reports or barbamz and other WxU worldwide weather watchers) wakes people up.  If not soon
sadly when these storms begin to hit "ones" home or country and the
costs of fixing up instead of preventing hits ones front door i hope one
stays safe then think was it worth saving some bucks now to loose
(hopefully only) more bucks later.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
-NAO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 25. Xyrus2000:



Climo? :D

Maybe you should start a show and call it Meteorology Street. "Today's weather forecast is brought to you by El Nino, the pacific decadal oscillation, and the equation for adiabatic lapse rate!"

You could have the whole gang. Dvorak Bird. Cumulupagus. Might be a hit. Maybe even make your own doll, Tickle-Me Climo. "HA HA HA! No La Nina this year! HA HA HA!"

Sorry...in a bit of a silly mood right now. Spring like weather does that to me. :)


I don't understand why I was quoted since I was giving an "atta boy". Perhaps your silly mood? Webber did a great job. Shall we be expecting Xyrus2000 video's anytime soon?

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 22. Patrap:

For me personally,it is NEVER about the numbers, the records nor the BS that all that brings. Its about the IMPACT to the Human Population.

Thats where the mustard meets da dog.


Everytime.


So true, we've seen majors make landfall and not cause death or widespread destruction and we've seen tropical storms claim scores and produce widespread damage through epic flooding. Perfect example was Patricia compared to what happened to Dominica with a system that wasn't even classified at landfall last season.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting 26. HurricaneHunterJoe:



Not getting my hopes up yet but several storms per GFS into California starting like the 25h Feb, into the first week of March. Hopefully El Nino has not shot his wad.
That one Week in January was pretty much it. 2.85" and 3.28" so far this year.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 23. flibinite:

Agreeing with win1gamegiantsplease... Haiyan was the most nearly perfect, incredible looking "hurricane" I've ever seen... completely annular and monstrous. How anything could be stronger than it was just seems wrong. :o

Jo




No doubt Haiyan was the strongest storm ever recorded. Pressure and wind speeds were underestimated, maybe considerably. Satellite representation compared to any other storm told the story. Surely stronger than Patricia's winds and the pressure was likely the lowest ever. But conjecture is all that will ever be.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 78 - 28

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6Blog Index

Top of Page

Category 6™

About

Cat 6 lead authors: WU cofounder Dr. Jeff Masters (right), who flew w/NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990, & WU meteorologist Bob Henson, @bhensonweather