More Than Half of Hurricane Matthew's U.S. Victims Drowned, CDC Says

Sean Breslin
Published: February 13, 2017

It wasn't devastating winds – more than half of Hurricane Matthew's United States deaths were drownings, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The final report said the hurricane was responsible for 43 deaths in the U.S., 23 of which were drownings. Of those 23 drowning victims, 18 were in vehicles. North Carolina had more than double the death toll of any other state; 26 people died as the storm raked the Old North State.

Prior to Matthew's arrival in the U.S., emergency managers warned residents in the path of the storm about the dangers of floodwaters, the report added.

(MORE: Matthew Destroyed 177 Miles of Dunes, USGS Says)

Here's a more detailed look at the CDC's data from Hurricane Matthew.

MORE: Hurricane Matthew


The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

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