We're changing our WunderBlogs. Learn more about this important update on our FAQ page.

ic eom wrætlic wiht on gewin sceapen

By: BaltimoreBrian , 10:03 PM GMT on November 27, 2016

NEWS

Anthropocene Magazine

Climate Signals

Phys.org latest news


Earth's Future

Bloomsberg News Sustainability Page

BBC News Science and Environment section

Neven's Arctic Sea Ice Blog

Climate News Network

Science Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Environment Section

The Washington Post Energy and Environment Section

The New York Times Science Section

Politico.com Climate Change Section


NBC News science page

NASA Goddard Youtube

AllAfrica.com Climate

Almost all images in comments can be expanded.


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

Log In or Join

You be able to leave comments on this blog.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1936 - 1886

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39Blog Index

1936. ChiThom
4:47 PM GMT on March 01, 2017
Quoting 1929. BaltimoreBrian:

SunnyDaysFla, you're welcome! I'm glad you like the lists :) ChiThom that tapestry is the Ehret die Frauen, by Marianne Stokes (1855 - 1927); more about it here. A good find! And I'm not waffling ;)


You are a researcher par excellance! Thank you for the information.
You're not waeflian .
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1935. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
4:23 AM GMT on March 01, 2017
you are welcome to try the short code, if you want. =P

{embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/_OO2PuGz-H8" type="text/html" width=700 height=400}
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1933. BaltimoreBrian
12:32 AM GMT on March 01, 2017
Old English word of the day: snāw-hwīt - snow-white. Pronounced "snaaw-hweet"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1932. LowerCal
9:50 PM GMT on February 28, 2017
Quoting 1923. BaltimoreBrian:
....Andy Weir's Best Seller 'The Martian' Gets a Classroom-Friendly Makeover Thoughts?
First of all there's the worthy goal of getting by school boards.

Second, to really increase sales the letters of the objected to words could be replaced by "*"'s. Kids' curiosity would drive new sales and they could learn the original words used. (OK, I'm just being flip on this second point.)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1930. BaltimoreBrian
12:55 AM GMT on February 28, 2017
Old English word of the day: frēorig - freezing, chilled, frigid, frozen; chilled with fear or sorrow, trembling, sad. Pronounced "fray-oh-ree".
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1929. BaltimoreBrian
12:52 AM GMT on February 28, 2017
SunnyDaysFla, you're welcome! I'm glad you like the lists :) ChiThom that tapestry is the Ehret die Frauen, by Marianne Stokes (1855 - 1927); more about it here. A good find! And I'm not waffling ;)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1928. ChiThom
2:57 AM GMT on February 27, 2017
Hey Brian, before you get away from me with the old historic pictures, here's a replica of an old tapestry in a German motif, maybe Black Forest.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1927. ChiThom
2:38 AM GMT on February 27, 2017
Quoting 1855. BaltimoreBrian:

Old English word of the day: wæflian - to talk foolishly. Pronounced "waff-lee-on"


Quit waffling. :-J
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1926. SunnyDaysFla
11:45 PM GMT on February 26, 2017
I am so glad that you are putting out your lists Brian. I learn about a lot of things that I would not normally hear about.. Thank You!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1925. BaltimoreBrian
10:13 PM GMT on February 26, 2017
*** Was breaking the taboo on research on climate engineering via albedo modification a moral hazard, or a moral imperative?

* A new approach to projecting 21st century sea-level changes and extremes

*** CMIP5 multimodel projections of extreme weather events in the humid subtropical Gangetic Plain region of India

* Risk forewarning of regional development sustainability based on a natural resources and environmental carrying index in China

*** How migratory birds respond to balmier autumns? Study of songbird migrants demonstrates the importance of temperature in the decision to begin migration

* Farther from the forest: 'Eye-opening' study shows rural US loses forests faster than cities

*** Melting sea ice may be speeding nature's clock in the Arctic: Warming Arctic is changing the picture of when inland plants first emerge

Oil and gas wastewater spills alter microbes in West Virginia waters

To reduce carbon emissions and increase crop yields in peatland soils, just add water

This non-toxic battery lasts a decade and could be renewable energy's missing piece

* Trump Eyes Easing Obama Rules for Sprawling Pipeline Network (with video)

Neanderthal DNA contributes to human gene expression



Official naming of surface features on Pluto and its satellites: First step approved

Ancient humans arrived in South America in multiple waves

Diamond's 2-billion-year growth charts tectonic shift in early Earth's carbon cycle

Neural networks promise sharpest ever images

Brightest neutron star yet has a multipolar magnetic field

Possible dark matter ties in Andromeda Galaxy



Examining exploding stars through the atomic nucleus
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1924. BaltimoreBrian
8:38 PM GMT on February 26, 2017
Old English words of the day:

ǣ-lādtēow - a legislator. Pronounced "aa-lawd-tay-oh"

swīn-hirde - a swine-herd. Pronounced "sween-hear-deh"

Image from the Queen Mary Psalter, 1315 Detail of a miniature of men beating down acorns to feed their pigs, on a calendar page for November



hīrsum-ness - obedience; readiness to obey or serve, humility; service, appointed work. Pronounced "hear-soom-ness"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1923. BaltimoreBrian
8:30 PM GMT on February 26, 2017
elioe thanks for the music video and your translation. Excellent!

999Ai2016, good article. Makes me think of an old Peter Gabriel song.



An article worth reading:

'Greatest threat to democracy': Commander of bin Laden raid slams Trump's anti-media sentiment (with video)

Andy Weir's Best Seller 'The Martian' Gets a Classroom-Friendly Makeover Thoughts?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1922. 999Ai2016
1:33 PM GMT on February 26, 2017

Click to enlarge.
Mosaic of @MarsCuriosity images of "Salsberry Peak," January 2015.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1921. elioe
12:53 AM GMT on February 25, 2017
Series on Netflix. I eat from a can.
I could clean up, but for whom?
The coffee is too mild, on this morning too.
Also, how do you do?

Perhaps I don't know how to talk to you
If we let time pass
But I will still write songs about you,
in the decade 2080's
I want to borrow your flannel shirt
While I'm a little drunk on a summer night
I miss you still
in the decade 2080's

In the weekend I have to stay awake
I don't want to be alone in the morning
Again, couples go home from a pub
They agree on what they should do next week
I won't send a message, I put louder my
music

Perhaps I don't know how to talk to you [...]

Forgive me if I'm weird
Or, I try to change, don't discriminate against me if you see me
kissing someone on the street when the pub is closing
Everytime I don't do such things, I almost call you

Perhaps I don't know how to talk to you [...]

SANNI - 2080-luvulla (virallinen musiikkivideo)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1919. BaltimoreBrian
1:36 AM GMT on February 24, 2017
Old English word of the day: eall-īsig - all icy. Pronounced "ay-all-ee-zee"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1917. BaltimoreBrian
1:19 AM GMT on February 23, 2017
Old English word of the day (Northumbrian Old English q.v comment # 1916) winter-burna - a stream that is full in winter, a winter flood, torrent. Pronounced "ween-tair-boor-nah"

burna became "burn" in medieval Scots---an Anglo-Saxon language that developed in southern Scotland and became separate from the English of England. The meaning also changed slightly from having the connotation of a vigorous stream to a slowly flowing stream within marshy banks or wetlands. The Battle of Bannockburn was fought on and around the Bannock Burn, a marshy stream, and was the greatest Scottish victory over the English. It's odd that "burn" was the word for a stream---it's hard to think of our definition for "burn" being more different than a marshy stream. An indication of how much the Anglo-Saxon "language" diverged during medieval times.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1916. BaltimoreBrian
1:07 AM GMT on February 23, 2017
LowerCal--defining different languages can be a slippery concept, particularly for tribes and chiefdoms at the edge of literacy. In those times, the parts of Europe where Germanic/Scandinavian tribes may have had dialects that gradually grew less intelligible with distance and lack of trading relations. There were no dictionaries, no grammar textbooks to codify languages. In Plantagenet England, the English dialects in the north, southwest and southeast near London were very different and peasants who went on journeys--e.g. pilgrimages from northern England to Canterbury had difficulty with southeastern English dialects. The Middle English of Geoffrey Chaucer is much closer to modern English than "English" writings from the north. Also, during late medieval times there was a "North Sea" language that traders and sailors used that had elements of English, Dutch, German, Danish and Norwegian that the sailors all understood while being difficult to understand by "landlubbers". The Icelandic sagas contain occasional references to English and Vikings being able to understand each other, and also contain a few references to Vikings and the Scots and Irish not being able to understand each other--lots of Irish women were kidnapped to Iceland and they "knew not the words". When I have visited the Netherlands I felt like I was on the edge of understanding Dutch---distorted by almost everyone there being able to speak English of course :)

There was a fair amount of trade between Norway/Denmark and England by the 700s before the Viking raids, with regular customs houses and those traders must have been able to understand each other for trade to work. I don't know if there was a common traders' "North Sea" language or creole at that time.

Xandra, what an exciting story! I'm seeing it everywhere--and Trappist is very close, astronomically speaking. How exciting it will be if one or more of those planets' atmospheres show signs of life!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1915. Xandra
6:28 PM GMT on February 22, 2017
From Nature:

These seven alien worlds could help explain how planets form

The Earth-sized astronomical bounty circles a dim star that flew under the radar of exoplanet researchers.


NASA/JPL-Caltech. An artist's illustration of what TRAPPIST-1's seven planets might look like.

Seven alien, Earth-sized worlds bask in the cool, red light of their parent star. The planetary menagerie exists around a star overlooked by other exoplanet hunters, although it is just 12 parsecs (39 light years) from Earth.

Astronomers have found other seven-planet systems before, but this is the first to have so many Earth-sized worlds. All of them orbit at the right distance to possibly have liquid water somewhere on their surfaces.

“To have this system of seven is really incredible,” says Elisa Quintana, an astrophysicist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “You can imagine how many nearby stars might harbour lots and lots of planets.”

Some of the planets were announced last year, but the authors debuted five newfound ones in a paper published on 22 February in Nature1. Because the system is so close to Earth, astronomers can study the planets’ atmospheres relatively easily. That could reveal an astonishing diversity of worlds, ranging in composition from rocky to icy.

“This system is going to be one of the best laboratories we have for understanding the evolution of small planets,” says Zachory Berta-Thompson, an astronomer at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Click here to read more.

More information:

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-telescope -reveals-largest-batch-of-earth-size-habitable-zon e-planets-around

Nature doi:10.1038/nature.2017.21512
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1914. LowerCal
10:47 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
Quoting 1913. BaltimoreBrian:

LowerCal, the Anglo-Saxons and the Vikings could understand each other. In fact, one of the Viking sagas explicitly refer to why the Vikings and the English King Edmund could understand each other but couldn't anymore when the sagas were written down in the late 12th century: "Back in those days the English and the Vikings came from the same people and could understand each other but 120 years ago William of Normandy conquered England and now the French language is spoken there" is from Egil's Saga.
In the early episodes of the historical drama when first contact takes place (late 8th Century) it portrays a necessity for translators.

From the Wikipedia...
The change to Old English from Old Norse was substantive, pervasive, and of a democratic character.[3][14] Old Norse and Old English resembled each other closely like cousins and with some words in common, they roughly understood each other;[14] in time the inflections melted away and the analytic pattern emerged.[17][19] It is most “important to recognize that in many words the English and Scandinavian language differed chiefly in their inflectional elements. The body of the word was so nearly the same in the two languages that only the endings would put obstacles in the way of mutual understanding. In the mixed population which existed in the Danelaw these endings must have led to much confusion, tending gradually to become obscured and finally lost.” This blending of peoples and languages resulted in “simplifying English grammar.”[3]
and elsewhere in the Wikipedia...
Near the end of the Old English period the English language underwent a third foreign influence, namely the Scandinavian influence of Old Norse. In addition to a great many place names, these consist mainly of items of basic vocabulary, and words concerned with particular administrative aspects of the Danelaw (that is, the area of land under Viking control, which included extensive holdings all along the eastern coast of England and Scotland). The Scandinavians spoke Old Norse, a language related to Old English in that both derived from the same ancestral Proto-Germanic language. It is very common for the intermixing of speakers of different dialects, such as those that occur during times of political unrest, to result in a mixed language, and one theory holds that exactly such a mixture of Old Norse and Old English is thought to have accelerated the decline of case endings in Old English.[199] The influence of Old Norse on the lexicon of the English language has been profound: responsible for such basic vocabulary items as sky, leg, the pronoun they, the verb form are, and hundreds of other words.[200]
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1913. BaltimoreBrian
10:03 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
LowerCal, the Anglo-Saxons and the Vikings could understand each other. In fact, one of the Viking sagas explicitly refer to why the Vikings and the English King Edmund could understand each other but couldn't anymore when the sagas were written down in the late 12th century: "Back in those days the English and the Vikings came from the same people and could understand each other but 120 years ago William of Normandy conquered England and now the French language is spoken there." is from Egil's Saga.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1912. LowerCal
9:48 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
Quoting 1911. BaltimoreBrian:

LowerCal no I haven't--it can be frustrating that so much good historical programming is available that I don't have time for!
Some Old English is spoken in "Vikings" subtitled in modern English.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1911. BaltimoreBrian
9:23 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
LowerCal no I haven't--it can be frustrating that so much good historical programming is available that I don't have time for!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1910. BaltimoreBrian
9:22 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
From "Containing Trump" in the March Atlantic

I tried to find some actions that can show a president is threatening democracy. I failed. In fact, I concluded that there can be no such list, because many of the worrisome things that an antidemocratic president might do look just like things that other presidents have done:

Use presidential power to bully corporations? Truman and Kennedy did that. Distort or exaggerate facts to initiate or escalate a war? Johnson and George W. Bush did that. Lie point-blank to the public? Eisenhower did that. Defy orders from the Supreme Court? Lincoln did that. Suspend habeas corpus? Lincoln did that, too. Spy on American activists? Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon did that. Start wars at will, without congressional approval? Truman did that. Censor "disloyal" speech and fire "disloyal" civil servants? Wilson did that. Incarcerate U.S. citizens of foreign extraction? Franklin D. Roosevelt did that. Use shady schemes to circumvent congressional strictures? Reagan did that. Preempt Justice Department prosecutors? Obama did that. Assert sweeping powers to lock people up without trial or judicial review? George W. Bush did that. Declare an open-ended national emergency? Bush did that, and Obama continued it. Use regulatory authority aggressively and, according to the courts, sometimes illegally? Obama did that. Kill a U.S. citizen abroad? Obama did that, too. Grant favors to political friends, and make mischief for political enemies? All presidents do that.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1909. LowerCal
9:18 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
Old English words

Brian, have you been watching the "Vikings" historical drama on the History Channel?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1907. BaltimoreBrian
8:47 PM GMT on February 21, 2017
Old English words of the day

winter-stund - a year's time. Pronounced "ween-tair-stoond"

sweoloþ - heat, burning. Pronounced "sway-oh-loth"

Image from the Douce Apocalypse, Westminster, 1270 AD



scyte-finger - the forefinger. Pronounced "shut-eh-feen-gair"

cræt-wīsa - a charioteer. Pronounced "krat-wee-zah"

Image from the Theodore Psalter, February 1066 - the latest known major Anglo-Saxon document from before the Norman Conquest.



witlēas-ness - witlessness, stupidity, dullness. Pronounced "weet-lay-oz-ness"

un-wæstm - evil growth, blight, a bad plant, weed; bad growth, failure of crops. Pronounced "oon-wast-m"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1906. vis0
11:25 PM GMT on February 17, 2017
Is there an 8th continent just figured out? 

i say its the 7th, my 2 cents at my zilly blog pg 11 or start of page12
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1905. BaltimoreBrian
6:46 PM GMT on February 16, 2017
vis0 (and other readers & contributors) I think it would be best if only I make political comments on my blog from now on)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1904. vis0
6:16 PM GMT on February 16, 2017


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1903. vis0
3:17 AM GMT on February 16, 2017


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1902. vis0
3:14 AM GMT on February 16, 2017
Agree, (heck i have my own blog got carried away)
Moved my comments from your last/recent page to my zilly blog so it can have the more normal flow.
 
Will still add links if i see you or other have not, i figure that's more as to your blogging style at WxU plus still ask you for some interesting words from ancient languages.
 
Thank You for allowing us to share our politics on a more populat blog.  
 
But rest assure when the next election cycle begins ~2 years create a new blog cause we're acomin with pens in both hands or typing ambidextrous ; - P.

Please folk (s) don't rush to my blog all at once ya might knock over a helpless flea

 
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1901. BaltimoreBrian
3:11 AM GMT on February 16, 2017
What We're Fighting For
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1899. BaltimoreBrian
12:36 AM GMT on February 16, 2017
Old English word of the day: worn-gehāt - a promise of numerous progeny. Pronounced "worn-yeh-hot"

Worn ya out? ;)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1898. BaltimoreBrian
12:33 AM GMT on February 16, 2017
LAbonbon and ycd0108, thank you for your linked stores--I will read them over the weekend.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1897. ycd0108
8:26 PM GMT on February 15, 2017
#1896:
A friend of mine wrote about her experiences as a Canadian Fisheries Officer on foreign boats.
She survived:
Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1896. LAbonbon
5:53 PM GMT on February 15, 2017
This article is a really compelling read.

He was supposed to protect the sea. Then he vanished from his ship
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1893. BaltimoreBrian
11:31 PM GMT on February 14, 2017
Old English word of the day: ge-coren - chosen, choice, good, beloved, dear. Pronounced "yeh-ko-rehn"

Mīn gecorena - my beloved. Pronounced "meen yeh-ko-rehn-ah"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1892. BaltimoreBrian
12:55 AM GMT on February 14, 2017
Some Valentine's Day cartoons:

The meetup:



The morning after:

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1890. BaltimoreBrian
11:52 PM GMT on February 13, 2017
The Economist cover for Valentine's Day week:

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1889. BaltimoreBrian
11:50 PM GMT on February 13, 2017
Old English word of the day: of-brytsig - very broken. Pronounced "ov-bruht-see"
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1888. vis0
11:01 PM GMT on February 12, 2017
"You've might  got     m---a -----i--------- l"**  (if it goes through)  

**this saying has been approved by today's USofA education board whose 2017  slogan is:: 

Were wee'r   rewritng the 5 W's.


i know i shouldn't speak, but am!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1887. BaltimoreBrian
9:01 PM GMT on February 12, 2017
Sunday reading:

* What drives universe's expansion? Quest to settle riddle over Einstein's theory may soon be over

Scientists estimate solar nebula's lifetime: Study finds the swirling gas disk disappeared within the solar system's first 4 million years

*** New, long-lasting flow battery could run for more than a decade with minimum upkeep: Battery stores energy in nontoxic, noncorrosive aqueous solutions

'Curiosity' exposes low CO2 level in Mars' primitive atmosphere

* Ancient signals from the early universe: For the first time, theoretical physicists have calculated the signal of specific gravitational wave sources that emerged fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The source of the signal is a long-lost cosmological phenomenon called 'oscillon'.



*** New engineered material can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption

*** New details of Greenland ice loss revealed: Data are dramatically increasing knowledge of how the ocean is melting the ice sheet



Cold plates and hot melts: New data on history of Pacific Ring of Fire

Litter levels in the depths of the Arctic are on the rise: Sea ice could be responsible for transporting plastic litter

Drought identified as key to severity of West Nile virus epidemics Counterintuitive

* Sea-level change in Southeast Asia 6,000 years ago has implications for today

Coal ash selenium found in fish in North Carolina lakes: Contamination persists in fish years after exposure to power plant waste

New study identifies organic matter composition as a critical factor controlling mercury methylation

*** Long-term impacts of deep-sea mineral mining: A new international study has demonstrated that deep-sea nodule mining will cause long-lasting damage to deep-sea life.

*** New scientific approach assesses land recovery following oil and gas drilling: Vegetation at most abandoned oil and gas pads slow to recover after 10 years.

* Bluebells may fail to flourish as warmer days speed start of spring

Diatoms: Tiny organisms with a massive impact
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
1886. BaltimoreBrian
8:35 PM GMT on February 12, 2017
This article deserves its own comment. It is lengthy. And it is beautiful.

!!! Greenland needs money. Is a uranium mine the answer?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 1936 - 1886

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39Blog Index

Top of Page
Ad Blocker Enabled

BaltimoreBrian doesn't have a bio yet.

BaltimoreBrian's Recent Photos